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Making Plans for Adult Cwd Enclosure.

Discussion in 'General Construction' started by epictreasure, Jan 30, 2014.

  1. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    For a snake or leopard gecko you could certainly convert a coffee table into a functional enclosure. Heat pads on the bottom and either use tap lights or small low profile led lights for ambient lighting only. Its certainly do able.

    Jaydsr make sure you really really really want a cwd before buying one. They are not an easy animal to care for. Their environment is tricky to maintain and expensive to set up. They are high maintenance. They are not very tame and dont generally tolerate handling much. Some dont seem to mind it but for the most part they are more of a look at and obey their every demand type of lizard. Plus there is their nails to keep in mind-almost all cwd owners look like they cut themselves or lose fights with cats on a regular basis.
     
  2. jaydsr2887

    jaydsr2887 Elite Member

    ok, that's why I haven't went and got stuff for one yet cause I still want to find out more about them...... and since they are very skittish then I might not want to get one, because I want something I can get out and show off to other people...... and enjoy, and as far as the maintinance goes, cant be much more then my iguana who takes up basically my entire day lol..... but could be wrong but if so then I think ill just stick to my next project I want which is a rhino iggy but that's not for a couple more years, been researching them for a while now, amazing animals they are....
     
  3. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    It is a bit more in maintenance as you have all the mess of the iggy PLUS a large water feature that needs to be kept clean. Adults arent as skittish as babies but they still arent something you can show off to people. They may allow one person that they are familiar with to hold them but strangers are definitely out. Some cwds are so stressed by strangers that they will go off food for extended periods of time from the stress of the visitors.
     
  4. epictreasure

    epictreasure Elite Member

    Sorry if this is a dumb question, but should I seal the wood before I put it together and then seal it again once everything is attached? And do I need to put the silicone on before or after the sealant, once everything has been put together?
    (I have been looking this up, but couldn't figure this out)
    Thanks. This has been really helpful. Hoping to get the wood in the next couple of weeks.
     
  5. safftaft

    safftaft Well-Known Member

    I would water seal all of the wooden aspects of your enclosure first and depending on the water sealant used go with at least 3-4 coats. It takes about a week to off gas if you leave it in the open, maybe more if you don't. Are you planning to silicone the wooden parts together?
     
  6. jaydsr2887

    jaydsr2887 Elite Member

    seal it after, if you seal it before then after you are just making twice as much work
     
  7. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I seal all parts with 3-4 coats before assembly, then another coat after its all put together. Since you need to sand between coats, its a lot easier when it is still in pieces.
     
  8. epictreasure

    epictreasure Elite Member

  9. epictreasure

    epictreasure Elite Member

    Last edited: Jan 31, 2014
  10. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Never heard of it. What is usually used is Min Wax polycrylic. A water based polyurethane.
     
  11. safftaft

    safftaft Well-Known Member

    I use an interior sealant for my projects but that would work. You will need more than a quart for what you're talking about though.
     
  12. jaydsr2887

    jaydsr2887 Elite Member

    aquarium silicone should be good as long as it is completely dried, its basically the same stuff you would use to hang things in your reptile viv
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    And anything marked as mold and mildew resistant is suspect. They put chemicals in to accomplish this.
     
  14. epictreasure

    epictreasure Elite Member

    what kind of silicone is usually used?
    and ya, ive seen polycrilic on here a lot but wasnt sure how water proof it is?
    I know I will need more than a quart, how much do you think I will need or is it just a see as you go process?
    how many coats should I put on it?
    and what do you use to seal joints; silicone, wood glue...?
    thanks so much
     
  15. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Polycrylic is very good product for cwd cages. I used 1 gallon and 1 quart to do 5 coats on Tais old cage. You really only need to do 3-4 coats but I decided I may as well use all of it since I had it. Then after I put the coats on I siliconed all the joints and put one more coat on top of that.
     
  16. epictreasure

    epictreasure Elite Member

    Is it better to use nails or screws and should I use wood glue or something to hold it together better?
     
  17. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    No need for wood glue and screws will hold it together better.
     
  18. epictreasure

    epictreasure Elite Member

    I found a couple of different canister filters on craigslist. Which do you prefer, fluval, eheim 2217, or a different brand?
    thanks
     
  19. jaydsr2887

    jaydsr2887 Elite Member

    fluval is good, I used to use one for my snapping turtles
     
  20. epictreasure

    epictreasure Elite Member

    Do you think I would need a lot of framing on the sides if I use 1/2" plywood? Or would corner braces on the inside with 2x4s or 2x2s be enough?

    A big thank you to everyone. You have all been such a big help. Im going to pick up the lumber and other basic supplies in a few days.
     

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