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Looks Like Whacking Day is Back...

Discussion in 'Burmese Pythons' started by Rayban, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. Rayban

    Rayban Elite Member

    was browsing the yahoo website and found this:

    Python Challenge Offers Cash Prizes to Florida Snake Hunters | ABC News - Yahoo! News Canada

    i think this is terrible... offering money to people to hunt and kill pythons? its like the simpsons wacking day episode in real life...yeesh.

    i understand that the snakes are invasive species, and are eating and threatning other endangered wildlife, but correct me if im wrong but is that not how nature sort of works? if you ask me, the more humane thing to do, is offer rewards for LIVE captures, and then those are shipped back to whatever native area can support them. or they are provided to reptile centers, zoos, etc. but paying people to go out and kill snakes... its just wrong imho.
     
  2. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    I don't agree with how they are going about it but I agree with the removal of the invasive species. The pythons are killing off the indigenous species yet there is no predator keeping them on check so it will ruin the ecosystem.
    But live captures and relocation or humane euthanasia seem like a better plan.
     
  3. Wyldrose

    Wyldrose Elite Member

    Very sad :(
    I wonder how many native animals/snakes will also be slaugtered???
     
  4. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    And the fact that its likely to turn into a circus with gun toting bozos blasting anything that moves.
     
  5. NancyA

    NancyA Elite Member

    It is sad that they kill them. Unfortunately there is no place for them. Most zoos today will not take wild caught for fear of introducing disease to their collections. There are so many breeders now of these species that it's safer to just get a captive bred animal. Most zoos also now breed their own and trade with other zoos. Native countries will not take them back for the same reasons. Diseases only found here being introduced causes the country to forbid the import and release of these animals. Florida doesn't have much choice at this point but to keep a bounty on the pythons, anacondas and boas found to try to preserve the ecosystem of the Everglades and other wetlands.
     
  6. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Then they should renounce the bounty and instead pay some professionals that know the dofference between native and invasive in the hopes of limiting the unneeded casualties.
     
  7. NancyA

    NancyA Elite Member

    Prior to this year they did have only those people with snake experience catching the snakes. They had to be residents of FL.
    I think that's where they made their mistake. Had they let people from outside the state help with the roundup they may have seen less killed and more adopted.
     
  8. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    They could catch and then sell cheap to herp enthusiasts that live outside the state.
     
  9. JoeyG

    JoeyG Subscribed User Premium Member

    I think it's sad anyway you look it at but being a man made problem I do think we're resposible for protecting the native species. There's no "good" solution to a very unfortunate problem.
     
  10. NancyA

    NancyA Elite Member

    JoeyG So very true.
     
  11. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    The problem with relocation is there is no where to relocate them to. And trying to take them back to Asia woud be not only be prohibitively expensive, you would also be transporting who knows what pathogens back with them. And euthanasia would also have the expense issue.

    Zoos have limited resources and most of them chose to use those resources in housing and breeding rare or endangered animals. Not common pet store species.
    Unfortunately the Florida legislators and their cronies have eliminated THAT option with their Python Bill.
     
  12. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    I meant relocation to private owners and breeders. Also if the government was the one relocating the animals out of the state they would add an addendum to the bill as the bill is geared more towards stopping them from coming in.
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    But if the government started basically dealing in burmese and sending them out of state,... they would be in violation of their own law.
     
  14. NancyA

    NancyA Elite Member

    While many zoos do prefer to breed rare and endangered animals many are not due to SSP designation within the AZA zoos. The stud book keepers designate yearly which animals are to be bred and where they will be bred. Many of the animals are shipped back and forth to the different zoos to maintain a constant control on the gene pool. You will find that many zoos do in fact breed pet store reptiles which are used in educational programs. This is generally done on a small scale. There is a large variety of tortoises and turtles, snakes, lizards and amphibians that are bred in zoos and then surplus animals are shared amongst other zoos.
     
  15. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    I'd venture to guess most enthusiasts wouldn't want anything to do with a WC, aggressive python or boa. Aside from that, apparently there are thousands of snakes out there...the logistics are simply against trapping/catching and re-homing that many animals. People need to start looking at this like the asian carp, snake head, wild pig crisis many states are currently being affected by, otherwise entire ecosystems will be at risk. Wiping out invasive species will not wipe out the entire species. It's an invasive species can wipe out natural species.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012
  16. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    I agree with killing off the larger specimens but the babies could be rehomed. And there has to be a better way than giving any person free range to shoot snakes. It just doesn't seem smart especially where they are usually close to housing developments.
     
  17. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

  18. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    I totally agree with the above article--there is bound to be collateral damage if the hunt were to ensue. That's the other edge of the sword. It's unfortunate that there aren't enough qualified people to get out there and take a real hold of the problem, which will only get worse.
     
  19. NancyA

    NancyA Elite Member

    There is one way to look at it. The idiots that are clueless will be wandering in the Everglades, how many won't ever be found? One way to strengthen the gene pool in Florida
     
  20. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    But the extreme idiots will be in parks and housing areas with shotguns.
     

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