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Jungle Carpet Python Info

Discussion in 'Carpet/Diamond Pythons' started by Max713, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    So I've got my next reptile planned, and it's got to be a Jungle Carpet! I've never been taken by a snake like this! Everything I would want in a snake, gorgeous looks, completely manageable size, relatively easy care, small housing requirements, generally good temperament with effort, and a long life. I plan on picking one up at a local reptile show on either April 30th or August 13th, and I'm trying to get everything in order before then.

    From what I understand, Carpets grow slow, only reaching ~4' at 2 years of age, and require such a small space! The general rule I've heard is one square foot of floor space for every foot of snake, and an enclosure no taller than 24". That means an 8' adult can be housed in a 4'x2'x2' for life very comfortably! That would be so easy! I spoke with several breeders all ready, 2 of which actually preferred slightly smaller enclosures at 36"x24"x15", both reporting years of successful keeping with said setup. I just can't believe they thrive in such a small space.

    Enclosure Plans:
    I would be building the cage similar to my current Tegu cage:
    -Plywood walls
    -Drylock Sealer
    -Painted black outside
    -Built in light fixture
    -Plexiglass front window
    -4'x2'x2'

    I've been told Carpets require a smaller space as a juvenile to feel comfortable, either a 10 or 20 gallon. Which I would house the snake until it was about 4', then he would move in to her new roomy 4x2. Cage size recommendations definitely varied from source to source, but one thing that didn't vary was the fact that bigger is most definitely not always better with this particular snake.

    Light/Heating:
    -Due to the low temperatures required, lighting will be minimal, but I'm having a hard time deciding which type will work best, but what ever it is, it will be completely un-reachable for the snake to avoid any burns
    -Heating will be provided by some sort of mat or under tank heater on the hot side
    -12 hours light, 12 hours dark

    Husbandry plans:
    -Humidity, a highly debated subject but I'm almost convinced high humidity is not needed. The happy medium seems to be around 50%, which is my plan as of now.
    -Temperatures: A 75-80F cold side, 90-95F hot.
    -Furniture, I'll provide 2 hides (one on the cold and hot side), plenty of climbing logs, and lots of foliage
    -Constant fresh water in a bowl large enough for the snake to soak itself
    -I will be using the same substrate as I do with my Tegu, Coco Husk - Coarse

    I understand that there are some cases where carpets never seem to calm down, although my understanding is that for the most part they are a very docile and friendly snake.

    Feeding
    I would start her off on pinky rats, as I've been told its sometimes difficult to make the switch from mice to rats when one starts with feeding mice. As the snake grows, I will begin feeding larger and larger rats.
    -Feed once ever 5-7 days as juveniles, and once every 2 weeks for adults


    Some questions I have:
    -Although I've been told a 90-95F hot side is preferred, I can't seem to find reliable info on the preferred basking surface temp
    -How much should I expect to spend on a "normal" jungle carpet at a show? I understand prices vary significantly depending on color, breeding, etc, but I will be looking for a rather normal and reasonably priced snake. I've seen them online anywhere from $125, to in the thousands, I just have no idea of what to expect at a show.
    -I need lighting tips for the hot side! Florescent bulbs? Halogen flood lamp?
    -Please let me know if I'm missing anything, or have any wrong information!

    Wow that was a long read, sorry about that...
     
  2. annaj328

    annaj328 Elite Member

    i got my jcp at a show last may. she was 4 months old and about 2 ft when i got her and she was 99 dollars. i saw some younger, duller jcps that were around 75 but they were not as active and that was a red flag to me. now she is just over a year and i would estimate that she is 3 and a half ft long. i cant really measure her because she really never sits still :). oh and she was snappy when she was smaller but no one has been bit or struck at for months now. she is still really squirrelly.

    here is a picture of her as a baby and her now, just to give you an idea of growth.
    @ 4months:
    momspics070.jpg
    @ 1 yr:
    P1030192.jpg P1030230.jpg
    She is currently in a 20 gal that the breeder said i could keep her in for a couple of years but it hasnt been 1 year yet and to me she seems really cramped. as far as lighting/heating, i am building her a 4x2 right now and i plan on having a heating panel and a fluorescent strip on during the day to show off her colors. right now she is in a 20 gal w/ a 60 watt red bulb that i have on a dimmer and a heat pad. the bulb is on 24/7. this set up keeps the ambient temp around 83 and her basking spot (branch under the bulb) around the lower 90s, seems to work well for her. any "day light" she gets is just the house naturally being lighter.

    they are definitely great snakes that i would recommend to anyone w/ some experience which i think you have so good choice! oh and i had no problem switching from mice to rats but some people have. good luck!
     

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  3. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    Thanks for the info, your snake is beautiful! But what JCP isn't right?

    I've been doing some more research, and I think I may have the lighting/heating situation solved. Thinking to go with a 100W ceramic heat element on the warm side in a "bulb cage" to avoid burns. For actually light, a 24-36" florescent tube tight at the top of the enclosure, I'll be ditching the heat pad, unless hot side temps are significantly low.
     
  4. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    For my IJ Carpets I was using a 60W CHE and a UTH on a 20G Long. With only the sunlight from the windows and lights in the house as lighting. I recently moved them over to tubs with a UTH on them to save some space and money on heating. I will eventually be getting them 36x24x18 Repti-racks cages with RHPs for heat and maybe a flourescent light if needed.
     
  5. Flint

    Flint Elite Member

    My JCP is in a 4Lx2Dx2.5H enclosure, and he only uses the top foot and a half. I will be down-sizing soon to a 4x2x2 because the taller cage gets too cold at the bottom, and he is never on the ground anyways.

    I use radiant heat panels, and I don't think I will ever use anything else. They are amazing, they can't burn your reptile, and they do a fantastic job of raising ambient temp and surface temps for basking. I can touch the surface and feel that it is hot, but it doesn't cause any pain. I highly recommended them. Mine are from Helix Control Systems. I also use the helix thermostats.
     
  6. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    That's interesting your JC only uses the top part of the enclosure, as they aren't considered very arboreal snakes. Maybe he stays off the ground for the sole reason that its too cold down there?

    Those helix panels look awesome, something new to consider now...
     
  7. Flint

    Flint Elite Member

    That's probably true. And thats why I'm down-sizing his cage. More heating isn't the answer, because his highest climbing branch (closest to the heat panels) gets to the upper 90's or even 100F. I don't want his basking spot to be 110F just so the extra space at the bottom is in the upper 70's.
     
  8. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    Most I've talked to recommended not going with anything taller than a 24" enclosure for that exact reason, as you've already discovered it's difficult to maintain a proper vertical heat gradient with an enclosure any taller.
     
  9. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    Got some cages set up, hoping I can pick a girl up big enough for the 29, if not she'll go in the 3.

    29 Gal
    Don't worry, there will be a secured lid on it when she comes home, lighting will also be changed to one ceramic heat emitter and 24" florescent bulb
    DSC_0003-15.jpg
    3 Gal
    DSC_0004-8.jpg
     

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  10. jeepguy

    jeepguy Elite Member

    If you are looking for some of the best carpets around. Please pm me and i will put you in touch with a very good friend. He does jags, ivories, ivory jags, IJ's and is the producer of jigsaw. If you google the last one one you will see how it is a new gene trying to be proven resembling the Ocelot. Bottom line is if they are are what you are looking into he can point you in the right direction and answer any questions about them. I would say check out Morelia also.
     
  11. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    I've got a quick question for you guys:
    I had to order the ceramic bulbs for the tank, so I need a substitute in the mean time, would these type of infrared night bulbs work for 24/7 heating?
    w w w.petmountain.c o m/category/462/1/reptile-night-bulbs.html (Take out the spaces in w w w and c o m)

    I know with some reptile species, especially diurnal ones, the light they put off can be bad for their eyes.
    Any input on using these type of bulbs 24/7 for a week or so?
     
  12. teach920

    teach920 Subscribed User Premium Member

    I'm new to snakes, but can say I have been using that exact moonlight bulb on my snake 24/7 since I got her and haven't noticed her avoiding it or anything.....(I have more experience with other reptiles and have also been using those moonlight blue ones on my Leopard Geckos and Crested Geckos 24/7 for Years and haven't had any negative consequences.... If one burns out and I am waiting on another blue moonlight to be shipped to me....I have, at times, also used that black light, (I usually only use the black light on my Dubia feeder Colony).

    Personally, I do not use the red ones, (I have heard others state that they are also ok.....personally, I just prefer the dark blue moonlight, (and occasionally the black light) because they are not as "bright" as the red light..
     

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