This Disappears When Logged In

Holes on Top of Female Red Ear Sliders Shell.

Discussion in 'Turtles' started by LeePixley, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. LeePixley

    LeePixley Member

    Need help, A few months back our dog got a hold of our little female Red Ear Slider, He chewed up her shell pretty good. I needed to know if there was a way to repair the holes on the top of her shell, or if she will be ok with them being there? They dont seem to bother her, they dont look infected and there has never been any sign of blood that i know of. Any suggetions would be helpful.

    Thank you
    Le Ann
     

    Attached Files:

    • 061.jpg
      061.jpg
      File size:
      95.8 KB
      Views:
      25
  2. mshrmheadcharge

    mshrmheadcharge Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

    I'm not certain, but maybe you can schedule a vet visit, to make sure everything is still in fact okay.
    Also, be sure to keep the dog and turtle apart.
     
  3. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Can you post a photo of the holes with her out of the water?
     
  4. LeePixley

    LeePixley Member

    Lol, Yes we did put them in a temp tank till we can get a fence up around the pond to keep the dog out.
     
  5. LeePixley

    LeePixley Member

    turtle1.jpg

    - - - Updated - - -

    turtle2.jpg
     
  6. JoeyG

    JoeyG Subscribed User Premium Member

    IMO by the hole on the shell and where it is I would have a vet check it out. Maybe nothing got damaged but it went through the animal and not just the shell. I'm not expert on them but certainly a check up wont hurt due to an opening leading to the insides... I thought you meant on the side or something, but that's dead center of the animal. Can you see inside and how long ago did it happen? Reptiles are tough but an antibiotic shot of something wouldn't hurt.... IMO
     
  7. LeePixley

    LeePixley Member

    The holes look worse then they really are, take 5 sheets of regular paper stack them together and thats how deep the holes are. i will be taking her to the vet as soon as i can.
     
  8. jarich

    jarich Elite Member

    Good grief, a "few months ago"?! Im not trying to be a jerk but come on, you must realize how neglectful that sounds. One of your animals chewed holes in another of your animals and youve just left it for months? There are ways to repair the shell, but right now you need to get to your vet and have your animal checked for infection and any other internal damage that might have occurred. Hopefully its just the scutes that were damaged.
     
  9. tbron

    tbron Elite Member

    that does look bad good luck. I wonder if you could use some sort of epoxy to seal the shell. it would be interesting. you could shape it anyway you like. make smiley face if you wanted.
     
  10. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    It actually looks like any openingins into the body cavity have been healed over. At this point if there isnt a sign of infection (any odd smell or soft squishy parts of the shell?) then there isnt much more you can do. IF there had been internal damage the turtle would have showed signs of it or been dead already. For now its just going to take a long time for the shell to heal back over. Try to increase the calcium you offer through either different diet or supplements.
    Also I wouldnt recommend the epoxy trick. A turtles shell is made up of his back bone and ribs and then covered in keratin scutes (similar to finger nails). Covering the bone and keratin in epoxy could cause damage as he grows. Best just to leave it be.
     
  11. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    They have had good results with repairing holes and cracked shell with a fiberglass mixture. However this would best be done by an experienced vet.
     
  12. tbron

    tbron Elite Member

    agreed. I never new turtles shells were like finger nails.
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Yes believe it or not turtle shells breathe! Back when I was a kid they used to sell hundreds of baby red eared sliders, with the shells painted in garish colors as well as also having flowers and other pictures on them.
    It didn't take long for the turtles to die!
    But considering the "care" information that came along with them it was going to happen anyway.
     
  14. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    and not too long ago the latest craze was to "bedazzle" tortoise shells so they were all blingy. But thats just mean.
     
  15. tbron

    tbron Elite Member

    do turtle shells stop growing?
     
  16. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Yes and no. Once a turtle reaches full size the bone part will stop growing but the keratin scutes will still continue to shed and new ones form.
     
  17. LeePixley

    LeePixley Member

    If i noticed any kind of infection or anything serious i would have rushed her to the vet.the holes are hard not soft, no weird smells. I rescue horses that are in bad shape if i can take care of them and not need a vet to bring them up to 100% then im sure i can care for a small turtle. If she was bleeding or if the holes started to puss or smell thats a different story
     
  18. jarich

    jarich Elite Member

    Ah, I see, its just a turtle, eh? Remember, your on a reptile forum. We see your turtles as being just as important as your horses, and requiring equally specialized care. Ive taken care of both and actually found horses to be the easier of the two most of the time ;)

    Im really not trying to be abrasive, but let me see if I can put it in terms you are familiar with. Im guessing since you rescue horses that you have seen some with hoof infections before, among other things. Depending on the source of the infection and the health of the horse, they can go a good long time before you start to see any indications. Its because your talking about an unusual part of the body regarding circulation. By the time you have a smell or puss or even lameness, you may already have a pretty substantial problem. Not usually a long term problem in a healthy individual, but it is painful, and can be a major problem in an unhealthy horse.

    The same is true of shells in turtles. By the time you notice puss and smell, you might already have a substantial problem, especially in a turtle that isnt fully healthy. Infected shells can often lead to blood poisoning and further complications, and by the time its that evident its much harder to treat. A quick run to the vet would have given you the ability to have the shell fixed right away and see if any treatment was needed. You didnt know it, but that was a risky bet you played with your turtles life. Im guessing since you rescue horses in bad shape that you meet people all the time that play such risks with their horses lives too. Some of them are probably very nice people who simply didnt know, but the animal still suffers either way. How do you feel about that when it happens? Im hoping you'll understand my previous reaction then too.

    At the end of the day, we all want to help you get your animal back to health. If you have a reptile/exotics vet in the area, they will be able to easily help you repair the shell. It shouldnt cost much either. Like Merlin said, its just a type of fibreglass patch essentially. The vet can also go over further care, or we can here if thats easier. But please, do make the effort to improve ALL the animals health that are in your care, not just the warm blooded ones. ;)
     

Share This Page