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Great News!

Discussion in 'Boas *General*' started by alicia123, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. alicia123

    alicia123 Elite Member

    My dumerils boa that I got from the expo a few weeks back ate her first f/t mouse tonight! The breeder I got her from only fed live, so I was very happy that she took the f/t mouse so easily. She also had her first shed with me a few days back. Which why I waited to feed her till now. It all came off in one nice piece. Just thought I would let everyone know how she is doing. :)

    Here is some pictures of her eating and of her shed. The pictures aren't very good, they were taken with my phone
     
  2. Dragonflies

    Dragonflies Banned User

    Congratulations, well done for getting the snake off live food. :)
     
  3. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    That is wonderful new! Bye the way, gorgeous looking snake!
     
  4. alicia123

    alicia123 Elite Member

    Yeah its great not having to worry about live food!



    Thanks!
     
  5. teach920

    teach920 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Congratulations.....glad she shed for you and then ate the Frozen/Thawed..
    Cure snake for sure...Thanks for sharing the pictures.
     
  6. HERPies

    HERPies Elite Member

    Congrats. Just an fyi that I have found... I fed frozen as well, one caution is to make sure they constrict it still, some of them figure out its dead and do a weak or no coil at all. Its fine for frozen, but if it is ever offered live again for any reason, they are lazy with the constriction and can get bit pretty bad. One more thing, I always offer when they are in shed. Most boas will eat anytime, if they don't eat in shed, you csn just freeze it again. Nothing wrong with waiting I just like to keep em on a tight schedule.
     
  7. alicia123

    alicia123 Elite Member

    Yeah I will make sure she is still constricting, I can see where that would be a problem. I just didnt want to try and feed her because she was still getting used to her new home, and hiding alot and I just didnt want to stress her out more. Thanks for the info!
     
  8. HERPies

    HERPies Elite Member

    No problem, I know of people who dont feed when in shed and they have very healthy snakes.... its just preference. I have a 2010 motley female and she started just biting and holding it in her mouth...weird to see that. so I shake it after she bites it and she throws a coil around it for a minute. I have just heard stories of larger snakes getting a live rat and only biting its back end and just getting knawed on... yuck
     
  9. gapeachkatie

    gapeachkatie Elite Member

    very beautiful girl. Congrats on the feed.
     
  10. BlackJack

    BlackJack Subscribed User Premium Member

    That's a beautiful boa. Congratulations on converting him to F/T. Don't EVER be tempted to go back to live! If he refuses a meal or two, it's just because he isn't hungry. If he's taken F/T once, he'll take it again, as long as it is warmed up sufficently after thawing. I drop it in a pan of hot water just before offering (or I sometimes use a hairdryer.)

    No offense to HERPies, but I personally disagree with this practice, except when dealing with neonates; I have found feeding during the snake's shed phase can cause problems with the shedding process and lead to tattered sheds. Coiling the food item can cause the old skin to stick in places and make it harder for the snake to get it off.
    In my experience, snakes seem to feel "icky" during the shed phase and prefer NOT to eat. (I imagine it's like having the flu). Often boas WILL eat during the blue phase of a shed, especially females, because they don't like to pass up the chance at a meal -- not necessarily because they are hungry. They are not aware that their next meal is only a week away.
    If I see my snake is turning milky and is less active, I hold off with food till they shed. Snakes do not eat on a regular basis in the wild.
    Besides all that, if they refuse the food while in shed, you have to toss out a perfectly good thawed mouse/rat. (That can get expensive.) Not worth all the hassle, IMO.
     
  11. HERPies

    HERPies Elite Member

    I don't disagree with not feeding, I just offer, if they eat it great, if not oh well. I don't offer if they will shed within I day, just if they are due to eat and they are in the early stages. I don't know about them feeling "icky" its possible i guess but there is no way of knowing how they feel. They are opportunistic feeders, and would definately eat in shed in the wild, however, we keep them captive and offer weekly, so it wouldn't hurt to skip a few days for them to finish. I have had clean sheds every time no matter what. humidity is the key, if its high enough there should be no problem with the shed even if they constricted something the day before....
     
  12. alicia123

    alicia123 Elite Member



    Thanks! And I don't ever plan on feeding her live, I would rather her skip a meal or two then take the risk of her getting hurt. I have always just warmed them up in hot water, and that seems to be good.
     
  13. teach920

    teach920 Subscribed User Premium Member

    I'm new to snakes, and have never heard of this until this post

    Is this a common practice?? I was under the impression once you had thawed out the pinkie/fuzzy or whatever, it was unhealthy/harmful to freeze it again?? Is this true??
     
  14. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    I know with Meat, if you thaw it out you need to cook it before you can freeze again, grocery store usually have previously frozen to let you know that it can't be re-froze. But with snakes and rodents I don't know.
    I know in the food service industry there is a two hour window where it is safe to eat food left out, but after the two hrs it isn't safe to eat.
    I would think that contact a feeder supplier like rodent pro and ask them.
     
  15. BlackJack

    BlackJack Subscribed User Premium Member

    It is DEFINITELY NOT SAFE to refreeze thawed food items!!!!Whole food (rats mice, etc.) have intestines, filled with intestinal bacteria that is not always completely killed when frozen. These start to grow rapidly when warmed... and can cause health problems.

    For those of you who have never had problems doing this, you've been lucky. THROW out ALL thawed, uneaten items!! A $5.00 rat is not worth a trip to the vet or antibiotics or even the suffering of a regurgitating snake. (Even my husband --who is about the most penny-pinching person I know -- will not risk refreezing. He's a doctor, so I trust him on that.)
    Although it does drive me nuts when my BP refuses rat after rat!
     
  16. teach920

    teach920 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Okay,...that is what I was thinking, so it is good to hear it confirmed from someone else.......
    Along those lines, I do know this past month, when my rosy hasn't eaten her fuzzy, I have taken it out of her feeding box, and dangled it in front of my pacman frog. If she grabs it and eats it great.....if she doesn't immediately go for it, I then throw it away.....I've been under the impression that since the fuzzy is less than 2 hours thawed, that it won't have any harmful effects for my pacman....I'm hoping this is indeed true??
     
  17. alicia123

    alicia123 Elite Member

    Thanks for clearing that up. I have never refrozen any thawed food items, I was not sure if it was really bad it just didnt seem like a good idea. But now I know never to do that. Thanks again!
     
  18. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I am going to reaffirm the already stated notion that you should toss out uneaten rodents. Once thawing begins, so too does decomposition. It either gets eaten or it gets tossed.
     
  19. HERPies

    HERPies Elite Member

    I have been told by rodent suppliers and boa breeders, you can refreeze all feeders accept pinkies once. Snakes will eat a dead animal in the wild, and have ridiculously strong acids to kill parasites, however, you don't want to knowingly feed something that is decayed. As long as the rodent was not heated our left out for hours it should be just fine. Key would should. I have never had a snake refuse and need to feed again so this isn't personal.just what I have heard from several people
     
  20. Dragonflies

    Dragonflies Banned User

    I usually find that when someone (who is essentially a layman) gives me that kind of information, it's because they are speaking from experience (ie, they've been lucky, or negative consequences happen later and aren't connected back).
    I would guess that a wild animal and a captive animal have somewhat different immune systems due to the environment in which they live. Just because a wild animal eats carrion, I personally would never assume that the same would be true of a captive animal of the same species.
    As someone said earlier "It's just not worth it for a $5 dollar rat", I would add "compared to the life of a much loved pet".

    I guess a (low risk) compromise between the two extremes would be that it's (probably) safe to wait a few hours and try again before disposing of the rat.
     

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