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Got a Rose Hair on the Way...

Discussion in 'Arachnids General' started by BeckyJ, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    I was talking to a guy at the pet shop I use today and ended up getting a rose hair tarantula for free! I will be picking it up in a few days, after I get my tank set up properly for it. My plan is to set up a 10 gallon aquarium with dry eco earth,screen top, heat pad on the bottom, digital thermometer, half log hide, small shallow water dish, low wattage fluorescent tube on top, and a few fake plants. How does this sound? Anything else you can suggest?
     
  2. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    Congrats on the upcoming T! Rose hairs do live in dry places and I'm glad you're not putting him on soaking wet dirt.
    How cold does your house get? How warm? Most T's won't need a heating pad and can live in 'room tempature' depending on your definitions. Lights and heat pads can sometimes overheat and bake the spider.
    But everything else sounds great! Love to see pictures.
     
  3. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    Thanks Pharoahound! I'm excited. My daughter has been thinking about what pet she wants for several months now and settled on a T so when my friend offered me his I took him up on it. This one won't be handled, at least not until I'm comfortable with it, but it should be a good learning experience for her. She did really well with her mantis last fall. I will take pics as soon as we get him/her.

    I usually keep my apartment pretty cool, though the neighbors crank up their heat at night. My rosy's tank is usually just around 62 on the cool end at night (when the heat lamp is off). Is that too cool? I can turn the heat up in my room during the day if that would be better than the heat pad.
     
  4. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    I've found that if you lay wide flat peices of wood leaning against the side entices the spider enjoys to climb (though only a few inches , falls can hurt pretty bad). They are often refered to as pets rocks but of you give them things to climb on and explore they gladly will. Rose hairs are fairly docile. Though handling them for the first time be cautious. They will be scared and try to back away. (I would too!) like any animal it's scared of large preditors so don't take it as aggression! During the day if it is ever that cool you add a small wattage regular old incandescent bulb that would most likely bump it up enough. But make sure it doesn't get in the upper 80's. At night if you could get it to at least 70 that would be better. I have covered 3 sides of my spiders tanks with cardboard or layers of paper and such to keep the temps up a little.
    Spiders are actually really interesting pets! Your daughter has good taste :p
    Any other questions don't hesitate to ask!
     
  5. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    Thanks for the ideas! I was planning on getting some cork rounds to make more hides for the two snakes, so I will grab an extra piece to make more hides and climbing areas for the T. I plan on having my daughter decorate some cardboard to cover the tank on two or three sides. I'm sure she will love it, and I know it will give the T some added security.

    My kids both have really sensitive skin, and I am allergic to bee venom, so I am a little nervous about handling the T, but I'm sure she will want to. After a suitable readjusting time we will probably give it a shot. She is going to be so excited. She has loved bugs since she was a toddler. I had a hard time teaching her to not mess with spiders, centipedes, and bees because she was convinced that every single bug is her friend. You should hear her trying to convince all her friends that being afraid of bugs and reptiles is just plain silly! :D
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  6. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    If you can find a few peebles and rocks I've found my spider will spin web all over them and they are good decorations! Just a few rocks here and there. The cardboard sounds good.

    Rose hair tarantulas and many others have If you can find a few peebles and rocks I've found my spider will spin web all over them and they are good decorations! Just a few rocks here and there. The cardboard sounds good.

    Rose hair tarantulas have ulcerating hairs covering their butts. So that might be a problem. The hairs will burn a little and sting so you should wash your hands if they kick the hairs off onto you. Also never hold the spider close to your eyes or mouth. You don't want to breath in the hairs or get them in your eyes.
     
  7. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    I'm a bit of a rock hound, and my kids are always bringing home pretty rocks for me. I usually clean up the ones I like the best and stick them in my aquarium, others go into the potted plants for decoration. Now I will have another use for them! :D

    Yeah, will definitely not be holding the T close to anyone's face. I have a rule about that. The only one of the animals we have ever had that was allowed close to the face is my rosy boa, and even then I'm careful about only letting certain people have her near there.. a bite on the face is not a nice thing.
     
  8. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    Can you recommend a good caresheet for rose hairs? The ones I'm finding don't provide much information. Not one has even suggested temps!
     
  9. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    CARE AND HUSBANDRY OF THE CHILEAN ROSE TARANTULA

    With my own research over the years and experience I base my care off of this one. It's pretty accurate.
    Though I disagree with a few of the suggestions.

    Temps shouldn't get down past 65ish if you have too and shouldn't get up to 86+
    They suggest not to use supplemental heat but they say that mostly because some people leave the light/heater on during hot days and come home to a freshly cooked arachnid.
     
  10. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    I hadn't come across that one yet. Thanks Pharoahound. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  11. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    You're welcome!
     
  12. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    So, I don't have as much eco earth as I thought.. would it be ok to mix a little organic potting soil in with it. I'd like to get a depth of at least 3 inches so she will be able to burrow. Should I leave it very very slightly damp (as in feeling cool to the touch, but not quite damp enough to stick together when squeezed) to help with burrowing?

    I forgot to find out yesterday, so I placed a call this morning, and we are getting a 4 year old female. :D
     
  13. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    Yep potting soil is perfectly fine! Near one end I'd add about four or five inches just incas. And yes the soil will dry out she can deal will it for a couple days. If you can break a few of the cork bark off you could star a burrow for her. It will encourage her to climb down and 'decorate'.

    They're sure it's female? If so she should be a nice plump girl!
     
  14. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    I will double check on the sex when I pick her up. I will definitely add more on one end to be sure she has plenty of burrowing room. How do you think I should start a burrow for her? How big around and how deep? I will send pics of the enclosure when I get it finished for you to critique. :)

    The water dish I have is about and inch and a half deep.. should I put some aquarium gravel in the bottom to make it shallower?
     
  15. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    We ended up bringing her home today. Thank goodness her enclosure was almost done by the time I got the call to come get her. Here are some pics.

    The first is her enclosure.. (the light is only for picture taking. I don't figure I will use it much, only occasionally for viewing or taking pictures. There is plenty of ambient light in the room to keep her happy.) She is housed in a 10 gallon aquarium with screen top, 60/40 mix of dry eco earth and organic potting soil, 2-5 inches deep, tamped down pretty firmly. There are 2 cork hides that are half or more buried to form burrows, two pieces of cork leaning against the sides (partially buried to make them more stable) with room for her to hide behind, and a half log stood on end against the back wall and half buried. Two fake plants, a shallow water dish, and a few small pretty rocks tossed in for variety. The terrarium is covered on three sides with cardboard, and we have cardboard for the front and top handy if we need to have the lights on at night. Look ok?
    IMG_20130121_171352.jpg

    The next two are pictures of her. The first was taken at the pet shop, and the second right after putting her into her new home. She is supposed to be about 4 or 5 years old, and possibly close to molting. (I need to do more research on molting.. when I'm not half asleep so I can remember what I read! haha)
    IMG_20130121_154606.jpg

    IMG_20130121_171401.jpg

    Any thoughts or ideas? Everything look ok to you?
     

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  16. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    Hi! Wow that set up looks great! Youve done a great job. I cant see anything wrong with it! Has she found a way into either of the burrows?
    She is going to be one happy spider.
     
  17. BeckyJ

    BeckyJ Elite Member

    Hi Tyler. Thanks! :) So far she has been hanging out in the borrow in the front corner. I think the big one in the middle get too much light for her. She has done a little rearranging, moved a couple rocks & moved the temperature probe from the back corner to the front. I need to get the temps up a little more. Right now they are staying right at 71° .
     
  18. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    That's fine, if you can get the temps in your house up a few degrees it should be fine.
    Glad to see she likes her new digs and the rearanging is a good sign.
     

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