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Getting a Granite Burm, Just a Question?

Discussion in 'Burmese Pythons' started by andys3ballpythons, Nov 10, 2010.

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  1. andys3ballpythons

    andys3ballpythons Elite Member

    so i am finally getting the granite burmese that i fell in love with about 2 and a half months ago, long story short, she got sold out from under me, and then the guy "didnt realize how big she was" and took her back to the local pet shop, now the pet shop owner is refusing to sell her to anyone but me, lol. any way just to be safe, i was curious if the care was similar to a ball python, set up, humidity, temp, ect. i have three balls, so i am very familiar with the care for them and just want to know if a burm is any different as far as care? thanks
     
  2. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Yes. Everything is a lot BIGGER! Are you prepared to feed and house a snake that may get in excess of 20 ft? And is quite capable of killing you?
    louisbaby.jpg
    Additionally burmese are not quite as laid back as ball pythons and have a really dramatic feeding response!
     

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  3. purplemuffin

    purplemuffin Elite Member

    Yeah, NEVER make the mistake of having any rodent smell on you or...in the room for that matter and expect the snake to behave! Even the tame ones tend to throw a scary hissing fit when you get them out of their enclosure...Intimidating!

    And don't forget you need friends to help you when she gets big!!
     
  4. bighog85

    bighog85 Elite Member

    I really wish you would have gone and read a care sheet before you had asked that question. It is best to not think that snakes of such different size and range have much in common care wise. I expect for keepers to do some research on their own before coming here with questions that would be answered with a bit of reading. I/we are happy to help but I am not going to write an entire care sheet every time someone just wants quick answers. Please just go do some reading and then come back and I can fill in some blanks for you. I don't think there are to many experienced burm keepers here other than myself but I am happy to help, just after you have shown some effort on your own part.
     
  5. bighog85

    bighog85 Elite Member

    Yup, several friends. Thats my big girl. 17 feet and 210 pounds and she is five years old. Be ready for this.
     

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  6. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    LOL! And that is NOT full grown!
     
  7. vega74

    vega74 Elite Member

    I love burms plan on buying an albino next year. They do get fairly big some only end up 10to12ft. Can be very tame if cared for correctly. But make no mistake when full grown never handle by yourself. No matter how friendly them seem they like any animal can become scared an attack a beloved owner with no signs at all.
     
  8. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    I would say this is when you should use the buddy system when feeding, kind of like a spotter just so you don't end up being the meal.:eek:
     
  9. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    But banking on that may get you in trouble! The average size is 16-20 ft but “Baby,” a Burmese python who lived at the Serpent Safari Park in Illinois, was 27 feet long and holds the record, validated by the Guinness book of records as the world’s heaviest living snake at 403 pounds.
     
  10. Pollywog

    Pollywog Member

    Absolutely beautiful snakes. How do you keep a snake that large? Do you keep it in an enclosure? I cant imagine how large it would have to be... garsh, I just cant imagine.

    Pollywog
     
  11. vega74

    vega74 Elite Member

    I am not saying count on it either but there are some out there that stay smaller.
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    But if you go at it with that mindset, if you are wrong, what then?
     
  13. vega74

    vega74 Elite Member

    I wasnt in any way saying go at it with that mindset. If it was takin that way I apologize. Obviously like with any animal plan on the room for it's theoretical biggest size. But not all burma are gonna be 20+ feet. An it's that misconception that gives them a bad rep as pets. Obviously not just anyone should run out an buy a burm.
     
  14. bighog85

    bighog85 Elite Member

    No, stupid people give then a bad rap as pets.
     
  15. andys3ballpythons

    andys3ballpythons Elite Member

    i am well aware how big they can get, i have a chain of reliable friends that also love herps, i read everything that i could on the burms but nothing that i found stated what the temp, and humidity should be, thats why i asked on here, i always research anything i dont know before i ask, even at 6 ft i realize her strength and i am as prepared as anyone can be, ive had snakes most of my life but this is my first and probably last burm, im ready to get the crew together to help "control" her, not to mention carry her, thanks for the help and working on giving her a room to herself.
     
  16. bighog85

    bighog85 Elite Member

    All of my big snakes stay in 8'x3' cages that I built. They stack on top of eachother and have sliding glass doors or lifting doors. All of them come out fairly often to stretch and get some exercise though or else the would need larger enclosures to stay healthy.
     
  17. bighog85

    bighog85 Elite Member

    You didn't try very hard then if you couldn't fine that. I have a hard time believing that you read "everything that I could" but were unable to find basic info such as temperature requirements. I am just gonna be straight with you here, you are NOT ready for a snake that can kill you. If you don't mind me asking; how old are you? I see this all of the time, people that get these snakes thinking that a ball python has prepared them and then they see what a REAL feeding response looks like, and they become afraid. Maybe they get bit and realize that a big snake bite can actually cause irreparable nerve damage rather than just a few pin pricks and a bit of bleeding. Read the link below and then reevaluate your ideas.

    Burmese Python
     
  18. andys3ballpythons

    andys3ballpythons Elite Member

    im 25 years old, like i said i just wanted a little help, ive had more than balls, just wasnt sure, dont need an *** chewing, just friendly advice, my whole family has been in the herp world, but havent ever had the pleasure of owning a burm. i am perfectly comfortable with owning this snake, i know a lot of thier habbits, and understand thier feeding response, you know nothing about me, and therefore you shouldnt tell people that they are not ready, maybe i just didnt get the right care sheet, most of them just had to say that they need an extreemly large enclosure which is common sense, i ask one question and you seem to think that i dont know ANYTHING, chill please, at least im not like some people and ask when its too late.
     
  19. bighog85

    bighog85 Elite Member

    I am happy that you are asking before hand, but if you aren't going to listen to people with experience with the snakes then you might as well have gotten it already. Sometimes advice has to go beyond how to take care of an animal and go towards should the person even get the animal in the first place. I am harping on you because if you type "burmese python care sheet" into google, you get a good twenty sites that all list temps and all of the basic info that you are asking for. This is a problem for me because it shows that you are not serious about doing this properly nor do you know basic steps of caring for a snake. If you were familiar with their habits, have experienced their feeding responses, and had been around them it seems like something should have rubbed off beyond making you want one. I tell the same thing to everyone wanting a giant. Go find a local herp society or somebody that responsibly keeps these guys and get some serious experience with a big one.
     
  20. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    Valid points - Burms and balls share precisely one thing in common, and nothing more. They are both pythons, but with regards to their care, the astronomical difference in their size alone means that their care will be astronomically different too.

    A Ball can comfortably live it's life in a fair-sized aquarium. You can mist it with a regular water bottle. You can easily find food for it. You can wipe up their feces with paper towels. None of that applies to Burms.

    Owning a Ball does not prepare you in any way for owning a burm. I have been keeping reptiles for 14+ years, including various small and midsize pythons and boas, and I STILL don't feel anywhere near qualified or equipped to take on a Burmese python.

    I do agree strongly with the suggestion that you go and get some hours in volunteering or working with burms through a local herp society or rescue. The experience will help prepare you for the actual ownership of a burmese python.
     
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