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Found in Flower bed

Discussion in 'Field Herping' started by venus, Oct 31, 2004.

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  1. venus

    venus Founding Member

    While cleaning out my flower bed, i came across this little snake. Can anyone identify it. I looked in my field guide and the only thing that look similar was an everglade rat snake...these are usualy only found in Florida. :confused: Can anyone else find something different?

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  2. MoLdYpOtAtOe

    MoLdYpOtAtOe Elite Member

    Not sure, but you are always lucky! I'm so jealous!
     
  3. DarkMagician207

    DarkMagician207 Elite Member

    don't know what it is either but what a cutie! :D
     
  4. Todd

    Todd Elite Member

    Best guess is an American Ratsnake. But there are roughly nine subspecies, so I'll say that it may be a Yellow Ratsnake (Elaphe obsoleta quadrivittata). Indigenous in Eastern USA to N.E. Mexico in a variety of habitats.

    Source: The Atlas of Snakes of the World; John Coborn
     
  5. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    The only problem with that is that Marsha lives in eastern Texas. Yellow rats do not. However, the yellow rat is one of many subspecies of the black rat snake (Elaphe obsoleta obsoleta). The only one of these subspecies that lives in Texas is the texas rat snake, although the black does cross slightly into north-eastern TX, but that's it. The only other two rats it could be are a corn snake or a great plains rat snake. Are you certain it is a rat snake? It could possibly be a coachwhip. Both the eastern and western coachwhips live in eastern Texas, and the western comes in either tan or red. The eastern has black, but no red. However, the snake you saw is a baby, correct? Coachwhips change color drastically from young to adult, and even from adult to adult. Whether its a rat or a coachwhip I don't know, cause I don't remember quite wjat your pic looks like. lol, I only saw it once, and this computer won't show any images for one stupid reason or another :mad:
     
  6. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Definitely a baby, maybe 7 inches. It was very small and very fast. Thanks for everyones help. I put him back in the flower bed we'll see if he sticks around. :D
     
  7. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Ok, got a different computer now so I can see the pic. Still hard to tell though, but it doesn't look like any rat snake to me. Did you get a look at its belly? Now that I can see it again, I'm thinking it may actually be a florida red-belly snake (Storeria occipitomaculata spp.) or a texas brown snake (Storeria dekayi spp.). lol, I really wanna find out what it was!!!
     
  8. Toadie78

    Toadie78 Elite Member

    it could be a ribbon or garter snake. they are pretty common and look different depending on where u find them.
     
  9. Jay DeMore

    Jay DeMore Elite Member

  10. MoLdYpOtAtOe

    MoLdYpOtAtOe Elite Member

    Are you sure it's a flame garter? Maybey venus can get some better quality pics to help us out again some time. I too would pay a great amount for a snake like that. But I also think it's great that you let him live his life where he belongs.
     
  11. Bitis Gabonica

    Bitis Gabonica Elite Member

    Definately not a yellow rat or a great plains rat. Pretty little thing whatever it is,. glad you put it back in the wild to live in his natural home though. He's adorable! :)
     
  12. steel rip

    steel rip Elite Member

    It looks like my Garter snake lol, but a diff colour. but I know its not a garter :rolleyes:
     
  13. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    I agree with Donna, its definately no garter snake. The flame is a northern color phase of the eastern garter snake, it wouldn't be found in Texas, but if you lived in Canada you might see one. The other red phases live in California. I am dead set on a brown snake. It looks identical and is the right size and in the right part of the country. Brown's are somewhat similar in appearance to garters, but still recognizably different.
     
  14. Jem_Scout

    Jem_Scout Elite Member

    I hope he stays in the garden so you can watch him grow up ...
    HEY!! Throw some thawed feeder mice out there and maybe he will stay! :p lol
     
  15. Jay DeMore

    Jay DeMore Elite Member

    The pattern and color are a dead match for a flame garter I saw at a show. However the local isn't right therefore it may not be.
     
  16. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Here we go. Found some websites with brown snakes. Brown snakes, as their name implies, are brown, but the shade of brown varies extremely from nearly gray, to nearly red, like Marsha's. I haven't seen many pics of them so red thouhg, looks like you found a special one! :D If you look at the pics in these links though, the snake looks the same, just a duller color in the links.

    http://www.houstonherp.com/TxBrown.htm

    http://www.herpnet.net/Iowa-Herpetology/reptiles/snakes/brown_snake.html

    http://www.geocities.com/eriks_snake_lifelist/s_d_texana.html

    Ok, thats enough links. There's too many out there.

    lol, I'd give a lot for a flame garter too! :D
     
  17. Dave68

    Dave68 Active Member

    My guess is a garter snake as well. Beauty of a find!

    Dave
     
  18. Todd

    Todd Elite Member

    I dont want to disagree with Jay if he's right (he probably is), but if we're still unsure, I still say that it's a subspecies of American Rat Snake. It'd be cool to have a vet take a look at it. :)
     
  19. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    I'm still going with brown snake. The color, pattern, size, and location all match perfectly. And just look at the markings on the head and neck, they're a dead give-away.
     
  20. venus

    venus Founding Member

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