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Foam Board

Discussion in 'General Construction' started by Mark, Nov 11, 2004.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Elite Member

    Is anyone familiar enough with foam board insulation (the blue sheets of it) to know whether it has a problem with off gassing?

    I have some great application ideas for it in my iguana's cage -- it will be covered such that even if it chips it will be fully contained. While small bits of it will be contained gasses will still be able to pass to and from it.

    thanks
    Mark
     
  2. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hello,
    Using and applying the material I could be of assistance with. Though I can't speak from experience on this, I dug up some technical info on the subject. Perhaps this will help.

    Polyurethane Foams

    All closed-cell polyurethane foam insulation made today is produced with a non-CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) gas as the blowing agent. This gas doesn’t insulate as well as insulation made with a CFC gas, however it is less destructive to our planet’s ozone layer. Foams made in this way have an aged R-value of R-6.5 per inch thickness. Their density is generally 2.0 lb/ft 3 (32.0 kilograms per cubic meter [kg/m3]). There are also low-density open-cell polyurethane foams (0.5 lb/ft 3 [ 8 kg/m3 ] ). These are similar to conventional polyurethane foams, but are more flexible. Some low-density varieties use carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) as the blowing agent.

    Low-density foams are sprayed into open wall cavities and rapidly expand to seal and fill the cavity. There is at least one manufacturer who offers a slow expanding foam. This type is intended for cavities in existing construction where there is no insulation. The liquid foam expands very slowly and thus reduces the chance of damaging the wall from over-expanding. The foam is water vapor permeable, remains flexible, and is resistant to wicking of moisture. It provides good air sealing and yields about R-3.6 per inch of thickness. It is also fire resistant and will not sustain a flame upon removal of the flame source.
     
  3. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hello,
    Just so people are aware, are you referring to Georgia Pacific 1/2" x 4' x 8' RS Styrofoam? (The R value of this foam is R-3 if that helps anyone figure out about the off gassing.)
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Elite Member

    4x8 sheets, yes, usually blue in colour, not the polystyrine stuff formed from a bunch of tiny balls, GP is a common name but there are a few others.

    The R value is of no intrest to me as I will be using it in a construction fashion rather than fir its insulation properties.

    I will be shaping and building up layers of the product then encapsulating it in a (essentially) a cloth bag as I refine some ig climbing toys. I am thinking about using this because of the light weight rigid properties it has (and it is pretty cheap).

    I am not thinking that off gassing will be much of a problem as there is no odor to it, no warnings advisories on it, and I have worked with it a lot sofar just not in Bob's house. Further more air is turned over a lot in Bob's cage as I am in and out of it all day and the walls are fabric allowing air flow.
     
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