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Edgar Hasn't Eaten for TWO MONTHS

Discussion in 'Corn Snakes' started by Drache Dame, Apr 13, 2014.

  1. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    Hey all I'm back with another question about Edgar! I haven't gotten him to eat in about 2 months, maybe more (I haven't been as diligent about keeping track as I should be). He's a 4 year old Male (born June 19th, 2009). He's in a 15gL aquarium, and is typically eating rat pups. For heat I use a 60W incandescent bulb & a wall-mounted heat pad. The warm side is $86 during the day, and the cool side is about 70 during the day. At night, I believe the warm side is about 75 and the cool side is about 60. His day/night cycle are kind of inconsistent as the timer I have broke (I've ordered a new one, it should be here Tuesday or Wednesday) so that could be contributing. He just shed recently (about a week or two ago) and he's been very active. I'm thinking that he might still be in mating-mode, but 2 months without eating seems like a long time. I tried offering him an adult mouse today, as I thought perhaps a smaller meal might entice him. However, no dice. The whole time he kept trying to see if he could sneak out of his tank instead. Substrate is Aspen shaving. He has 3 hides, one that spans the tank, one on the warm side, and one on the cool side. He also has a water dish with water in it, and I have seen him drink. Here are two pictures of him & his tank. As you can see he's out and about. At what point should I start to worry? Last year he did go into mating-mode, but it didn't last nearly as long.
     

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  2. EriksExotics

    EriksExotics Elite Member

    Hi. First issue is that the enclosure is too small. Where are the hide spaces? I saw that you said there's three but I don't see them. Secondly, Is the probe for that thermo in his water dish or is only the cord in there?
     
  3. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    I'm not sure if you looked closely enough at the pictures. There's one hide very clearly in the middle, and one very clearly shaped like a skull in the top-left, and then one in the top-right that, admittedly, is not easily visible due to the lighting. The probe is not in the water, he just dragged the cord there right before I took the picture, I've since moved it. I don't think the enclosure is too small, as many racks have smaller dimensions, and he's been in this enclosure for 4 years without any eating issues (save for last years mating season).
     
  4. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    I think 60 is a little chilly. Even for corn snakes. Daytime hot side temps seem good but I wouldn't let it fall below 70 to 75 any time.

    You could feeding him in a container like tote with the lid secured with only him and the mouse in it. Make it see through and very very low traffic when you do it. I usually don't even move until they are halfway done eating but I stay right there with them if any problems should arise. Take away all the interesting things maybe that will help.
     
  5. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    Hmm. I'll have to pick up a CHE or night-bulb for at night then. It's possible it's getting too cold at night for him, but I haven't seen any indication of hibernating behavior. If he still doesn't eat when I offer again in 2 weeks, I'll put him in his carrier and feed him in there.
     
  6. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    Corn snakes doesn't hibernate. They need the heat to process food they eat. So if they don't have the proper temps then they can't process food, which might be the reason for not eating. try warming it up for a few (2-3) days then try again.

    Try the mouse again. Rat pups seem too small for him. I feed fuzzies to my yearling corn snakes. Which is similar in size to rat pups.
     
  7. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    Rat Pups are definitely not the same size as fuzzies, they are a bit larger than large adult mice. After looking, it looks like these are closer to rat weanlings, rather than pups. Also, corn snakes DO brumate, which is similar to hibernation, and the behavior I'm seeing in him is definitely NOT brumation behavior. Corn snakes will also hibernate in the wild when seasonal temperatures dictate it.
     
  8. EriksExotics

    EriksExotics Elite Member

    Could just be those pictures but he looked too big for that cage. Is he lethargic or loosing weight?
     
  9. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    I said similar, not the same size. Yes, they brumate in captivity which is metabolism slowing down. Hibernation is when it all but stops or close to it. Yes they hibernate in wild, but I've heard most die when it's that extreme of temperatures in wild. Never seen it as i live in Ohio. Either way, Ive never lowered my temps that much so ive never seen it in mine. My point was 60 degrees is brumation temperatures. Since you say he is not brumating then I wouldn't worry about it. Warm him up and see if that helps. Good luck with getting him to eat. I really hate problem feeders. I've had plenty through the years.
     
  10. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    Not at all. He's very active, and he shed recently.

    they're not even close to the same size. I'll pick up a CHE/night bulb sometime this week. I don't think he's brumating though. I think that it's possible the probe was getting an inaccurate reading based on the way it was placed. I'll monitor it.
     
  11. EriksExotics

    EriksExotics Elite Member

    If he's active and not loosing weight just keep offering food every 2 weeks
     
  12. MorganLeFay

    MorganLeFay Elite Member

    Corns ideally should have about 40 gallons. 15 is a bit small, especially for an adult. Continue to offer food and crank up the temperatures a bit, it'll help both with digestion and appetite.
     
  13. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    Pretty much everything says 20 is ideal, and it's only 6" longer than a 15. I've been considering upping him to a 20 or 29, but I don't have any place to put it right now, as I live in a small apartment.
     
  14. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    20 is minimum size is what I have read and hear.
     
  15. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    A 20 gallon is fine.
     
  16. MorganLeFay

    MorganLeFay Elite Member

    My 3.5 foot milk is in a 40gal and I can still see that it's only just big enough. I guess it depends on floor space. When getting an enclosure you should take into account both the size of the snake and it's activity level. Corn snakes are not exactly behemoths (although they can reach around 5 feet in length), but they will appreciate the extra space to move around, like all colubrids.
     
  17. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    a 20L is only 6" longer than a 15L does the 6" really make a huge difference? The space his tank is in right now JUST fits the 15g. The only other place I could put it is in front of a window and I worry it would get too cold or too hot (I live in Texas, and the temperature varies a lot).

    Edit: Everyone who is telling me I HAVE to get a 40g can just stop because I know that is completely false, and I'm not getting a 40g tank. Thanks for your input and have a nice day.
     
  18. MorganLeFay

    MorganLeFay Elite Member

    Nobody's saying that you HAVE to get a 40gal. It's just that he'd have a better quality of life and more room to move around and stretch out (corns can be very active). It's a bit like keeping fish in a pickle jar vs a fish tank. Sometimes the reason for lack of appetite or health issues in snakes is due to stress, which can be brought on by various things, including a too small vivarium. A tank for an adult corn should be around 30-50 inches long, and corns will certainly appreciate a bit of room to climb.
    It's OK if you don't have the room right now, but if you ever have the opprtunity to upgrade it, then don't hesitate to do so.
     
  19. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    30 inches is a 20g tank. While I would love to have a big tank for him, until I have a house it's just not really in the cards. For the record, I wasn't necessarily referring to you, but there have been people telling me a 40g is required.
     
  20. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    While bigger is always better, people forget that snakes do not need to lay out straight. Matter of fact most of them will seldom be seen laying out straight.
    And I can guarantee you that the people who breed corns in any numbers do not have a houseful of 40 gallon tanks.
     

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