This Disappears When Logged In

Corn snake lighting

Discussion in 'Snakes - General' started by thead11, Oct 15, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. thead11

    thead11 Elite Member

    Hey guys! OK, so I am totally confused about lighting for my corn snake. I've read online that they don't need a light, but when we got her, we were told to use a blue light. Can someone please clear this up for me?

    We were using a blue light, then switched to a red light per someone's advice, but she isn't active at all with the red one. I also read online that the blue and black lights may harm the snake in some way. I really want her to be the happiest she can be, and I want to do everything possible to make her that way.

    Thanks,

    Tessa:confused:
     
  2. venus

    venus Founding Member

    They do not require any special lighting. They will always benefit from UVB light but its not required.
     
  3. thead11

    thead11 Elite Member

    thanks a lot.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hello,

    How are you currently heating the enclosure? If you don't mind, please post the enclosure size, heating, temps, etc. All of these factors could be playing a role in what type of lighting element you need.
     
  5. thead11

    thead11 Elite Member

    Well at the moment she is in a 2.5 gallon aquarium, which the pet store told us would be alright until she gets bigger. I am using an under the tank heater. The cold side of the tank is about 70 degrees and I don't have a thermometer on the warm side.

    If any of this is wrong please let me know
     
  6. thead11

    thead11 Elite Member

    I forgot to say that she is 8 weeks old, if that has any effect.
     
  7. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    The petstore lied to you. It is impossible to create any type of heat gradient in a 2.5 gallon enclosure. The heat pad must take up most of the floor.

    I would suggest reading this caresheet: Cornsnake Caresheet

    That should cover just about everything you need to get started.

    At the bare minimum, the little guy should be housed in a 10 gallon tank. Its small enough for the neo to feel secure but large enough to allow for multiple hides and to create a semi-decent heat gradient.

    What is the temp of the basking spot/uth location?
     
  8. thead11

    thead11 Elite Member

    I'm not sure what the temp. is on the warm side.

    I feel like an idiot for keeping her in the small aquarium.

    Thanks for the care sheet, it will really help. One question though, it says to use the margerine container with moss in it to help with shedding, but when in the shedding process should that be used?
     
  9. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    You can actually leave the moist hide in there all the time if you wish. If you are checking the snake daily, it would be added once you noticed the eyes go blue - hazy.

    Once she has shed successfully, it could be removed.
     
  10. DarkMagician207

    DarkMagician207 Elite Member

    definitely take her out of that little enclosure. i started my babies out in a 15 gallon and now they are in a 20 long. make sure you have hides for your baby so he/she feels secure. for heat an under the tank heater works, use it on the underside of one side of the tank. in the summer, i just use that for heat but in the winter i also use a 50 to 60 watt bulb on the same side as the heat pad. this way they can move to the cool side when they get too warm or go to the warm end when they get too cool. definitely read the caresheet, it helps alot. and corn snakes are such great snakes, i started with one and now have two and i still want more. good luck, hope you enjoy yours! :D
     
  11. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    GRRRRR! The things petstores say to make a sale! 2.5 gal indeed!:mad:
    You most definately need a thermometer in the tank! Reptiles' entire metabolism and body functions are linked to the temperature of their environment.
    Too cold and they cannot digest their food or fight off illness. Too hot and you cook them!
    And make sure and get you a good digital thermometer from a hardware or garden center. The little stick on jobs are notoriously inaccurate.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page