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centipedes

Discussion in 'Invertebrates General' started by furryscaly, Dec 9, 2006.

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  1. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    I have no idea what species either of these is. The first two are of a huge one from Asia. The second 'pede is "smaller" and supposedly from Texas.

    Silhouetted from below.
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    She's sleeping.
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    Critter's hard to photograph. He rarely sits still!
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    Here he was cleaning his antennae. I snapped this just after he released one and before he grabbed the other.
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  2. Colleen

    Colleen Elite Member

    Matt, you don't know what kind they are. I'm having a heart attach. LOL Cool looking centipedes. I'm still looking for my African black millipedes.
     
  3. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Haha, perhaps I'm more motivated when doing IDs for others instead :p If you ever have the opportunity to go to a reptile show you're likely to find your millipedes. If not, you can always find them online.
     
  4. CodyW

    CodyW Elite Member

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    Matt can you ID these for me? :D OO I feel so cruel but it feels so good :)
     
  5. Colleen

    Colleen Elite Member

    Matt, I haven't been able to find them at shows around here and the shipping is a killer, more then the millipedes.
     
  6. DarkMagician207

    DarkMagician207 Elite Member

    pretty cool looking i like the first pic, looks neat. :)
     
  7. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    lol, nice try :p I'll get around to it eventually I'm sure. Centipedes and millipedes are a real challenge unless you REALLY know what you're doing. With birds, reptiles, and such I can at least narrow it down to start with. With 'pedes I've just got to get lucky.

    It depends on how you ship them. Since it's now cold, I'd wait until spring. Whenever I order inverts though, I just have them sent whatever way is cheapest, even if it takes a week. Unlike when shipping reptiles, it's rarely a complication with invertebrates.
     
  8. Manhirwen

    Manhirwen Elite Member

    Oh geez, I actually really don't like those...nice pics though.
     
  9. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I don't know the ID on it but I can tell you that the lighter colored one looks like what we have in Oklahoma so a Texas origin is a possibilty.
     
  10. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Cool pics matt...good try cody, that was a good one :D
     
  11. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    She also looks, to the casual eye, exactly like several species in the Mediterranean, Africa, and Asia, and that's why they're so hard to ID ;) You really have to know the picky details, like how many bumps on the third leg from the head on one species versus another, or something like that (to make up a minute detail as an example). But if you've seen 'pedes like that in OK and I bought her as a "Texas centipede" then that is probably where she's from. Now I just have to find out what kinds of centipedes you have there...
     
  12. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Scolopendra polymorpha (North American tiger) and Scolopendra subspinipes (Vietnamese giant). I saw you replying Iturnrocks, and thought I'd beat you to it ;) But I'm still curious as to what you were going to say :p

    Hmm, but since I'm here I might as well post another one of Critter that I took recently :D He's envenomating a cricket. Just a tidbit of random information to go with the picture, but a centipede's "fangs" are actually called maxillipeds, and they're not mouthparts. They're modified legs that contain venom glands and aren't even connected to the head, but the first segment behind it.
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  13. iturnrocks

    iturnrocks Elite Member

    I too was going to say S. polymorpha, but I couldnt find my picture. It was on my laptop at work, so Im posting it now.

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  14. iturnrocks

    iturnrocks Elite Member

    For those of you who want to get into centipedes, here is how good it can get. This is NOT me- please dont ask how I could do this, because this is NOT ME.

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  15. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    It wouldn't be ME either! LOL!:eek:
     
  16. MRHickey

    MRHickey Elite Member

    I always thought those things bit like hard, so I never have been all about playing with them. If I ever had one it would be for display only.
     
  17. iturnrocks

    iturnrocks Elite Member

    Some people get bit just to see what happens

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    Heres the description:

    five days after being bit, my hand has swelled up again... i'm *pretty* sure i was envenomated

    most amusing, the spot where i was bitten for only a couple seconds by the same individual as this report is about also swelled up....
    *AND* the spot where a tiny 1" (2.5cm) 2i baby bit me ALSO itched and turned red... and that spot is a week older than the other two bites and never bothered me before!

    i suspect with all the chewing the centipede drove venom into my interstitial spaces in addition to mainlining some


    Heres a story about someone getting bit by my fav, the S. heros

    Method: Flip rock...grap 'pede...& QUICKLY toss into a coffee can. From the coffee can, you can coax the centipede into the vial and/or deli cup AT YOUR PACE...he isn't going anywhere. This method worked great on the first 2...but I learned a valuable lesson on the 3rd.....I grabbed him ( a big one...8"+) and he flipped around and latched onto the topside of the glove (only the bottom were covered in the rubber...the tops ar thin cotton).... he grabbed my finger like it was nothing...I dropped the 'pede and my coffee can...I had just a tad bit of blood but it really felt like someone took a hammer and smashed my finger...this really hurt... I experienced some limited swelling, irratation and pain. It lasted for the next few hours and I had limited mobility of the fingure (probably because of the swelling and me being a "baby" about "my hurt finger" lol).

    Heres a pic of one killing an adult mouse:
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    Heres a pic of one in a 20L aquarium. Note: the plexi dividers didnt work, they just climb the silicone and kill each other.

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  18. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    I love the Scolopendra heros castaneiceps :D They're beautiful pedes. I've never been bitten yet, and I'm not looking forward to it! Whenever I have to move mine I usually try and persuade them to go in a jar or I use a forceps.
     
  19. iturnrocks

    iturnrocks Elite Member

    I too, choose to use tongs. I bought a set of nice BBQ tongs with no spring specifically for catching these critters. That way I know exactly how much pressure I am applying. So far, I have had no injuries to myself or the pedes.
     
  20. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    That's pretty cool. I'll have to keep that in mind if I ever visit the southwest. I've never had a need for 'pede catching tongs yet this far north. I suppose they could come in handy should any of mine escape though.

    And hey, since we're on the topic of centipedes, here's a geophilomorph I caught and lost a couple days ago:

    [​IMG]
     
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