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Burmese Breeding Question

Discussion in 'Burmese Pythons' started by slitheringninja, Mar 28, 2009.

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  1. slitheringninja

    slitheringninja New Member

    I recently bought a female burm and I went to get her out this morning and noticed she laid eggs! I didn't even know she was pregnant. I've got lots of buyers already lined up but I don't really know anything about what to do to ensure they live. How and what do I do to ensure they live?
     
  2. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    At this point you pretty much have two options (1) Let mom incubate the eggs on her own or (2) take the eggs and incubate them yourself. If she is going to incubate the eggs you may want to invest in a "nesting box" or make one. This depends on the substrate you use obviously you wouldn't want to leave her and the eggs on newspaper. I would maybe use a cat's litter box or something bigger with some vermiculite in it and transfer the eggs and the mother into the box. If you do take the eggs to incubate them yourself make sure the eggs are picked up and put down in the incubator in the same position you removed them (by this I mean DO NOT TURN the eggs). The embryos attach themselves to the top of the egg and turning them will kill the embryo. I am quoting this from memory so please bear with me. You can also check the caresheets section of this website for more info. I am sure if I missed anything someone else more experienced with burm breeding will be glad to help out.
     
  3. KKHerps

    KKHerps Elite Member

    first off, incubating the eggs in a incubator raises a risk of mistake. the mother snake will incubate and humidify the eggs. putting the eggs in the tank will raise a risk of overheating,under heating, de-humidifying or again, over humidifying. of course there is a chance that the snake will make a mistake too. but if you choose to let the snake incubate then keep the tank humid and warm, but i don't know the exact numbers.

    but I may be wrong, I am quoting too from a breeder who said that the little girl (turned out to be a boy;)) ball python may have eggs. there should be more info on the way!
     
  4. titus

    titus Elite Member Premium Member

    Your best moving the eggs to an incubator, temps in the cage can run to high or too low for whats needed and humidity is more of an issue. Mix your incubation substrate 1:1 with water and keep the temps at about 87F. Or your other option is to move both the snake and eggs to a more controlled incubator type cage. With very little airflow and very good insulation so you have near constant humidity and temps.
     
  5. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    I knew someone with more breeding/incubating experience would come on to add their knowledge, thanks guys.
     
  6. burmmamma

    burmmamma Member

    Make sure your temps stay at least 86-87 degrees (so she can bring it up the few degrees if she needs to) and keep your humidity above 60%.

    I would move them to an incubator-if you need some help with that send me a pm.
     
  7. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    You've left out an important part. Has she mated? Has she been around a male? Just because she laid eggs doesn't mean they are fertile. Female reptiles lay eggs, much like female mammals get their periods.
     
  8. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    I'm not sure snakes have been known to lay blanks. I know they have "slugs" sometimes.

    You can "candle" the eggs with a flashlight or small LED. If you see veins, they are fertile.
     
  9. Drache Dame

    Drache Dame Elite Member

    Huh. I was always under the impression that even snakes needed to mate to have fertile eggs. I've never done snake breeding, so I could be completely wrong. I've never owned snakes either, so please feel free to correct me!
     
  10. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    I read a post by Titus on a different thread. Apparently, snakes do (on somewhat rare occasions) lay unfertilized eggs. Once in a while, an unmated snake can lay fertilized eggs, though the hatchlings are usually (though not always) deformed.

    You should still be able to candle them without even handling them, just get a small LED light or flashlight, and hold it up to the egg, and look for veins.
     
  11. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    I believe I also read somewhere that there is a certain species of snake that is totally female and they actually lay eggs that are clones of themselves. They require no fertilization and all the hatchlings are of course also female. This does not apply to burms though. I don't know if burms can lay fertile eggs without mating. I also know that certain species of snakes can store sperm for several months and possibly from one breeding season to the next so it may appear as though the snake has laid eggs without mating.
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I have never heard of a case where an unmated female snake lay fertilized eggs. They can store sperm, to lay later, convincing new keepers that they have something miraculous!.

    There are of lizards that do practice parthogenesis and in fact all of certain populations are females. There are also at least 2 accounts of reproduction in Komodo dragons that have never been with a male.

    I've just never known of it to happen with snakes.
     
  13. titus

    titus Elite Member Premium Member

    I would think that these eggs are a result of an earlier mating, as far as I know, there's been no recorded cases of burms trying to clone. And for a snake to lay a full clutch of infertile eggs is almost unkown. There's a good chance that a few are fertile, but most won't be if there hasn't been recent mating.
     
  14. titus

    titus Elite Member Premium Member

    There have been a pair of cases with corn snakes that I know of. If I remember right one was one of Rich Z's animals and another was one of the first Delute morphs that the person that writes The Cornsnake Morph Guide bred. It was talked about on Cornsnakes.com for a while a few years back, even with pictures of the mostly dead offspring. But these two cases from seasoned breeders are the only ones I would truly trust as true.
     
  15. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    According to the book "SNAKE" by Chris Mattison, Pg 31. "Single-sex snake- Not all snakes need to mate in order to reproduce their species successfully. The Brahminy blind snake, a native of India and Southeaast Asia but now found in many other warm countries, including South Africa and Australia, is the only parthenogen (female only) species. As soon as each snake is mature, it begins to lay fertile eggs, without having mated. All of these eggs subsequently hatch into females that are clones of their mother. In general, parthenogen species tend to be very successful for a while, but, in the long term, they lack the variability that would allow them to adapt to changing conditions."
     
  16. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hmmmmm! I learned something new today!!!!!!!!
     
  17. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    Learning new things is what life is all about. I surprised myself when I remembered that point and again when I went to the correct book AND the correct page. I love to read about snakes and every time a Holiday comes up I ask for reptile books.
     
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