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Breeding Coelognathus (Elaphe) helena - some pics

Discussion in 'Ratsnakes' started by Rob Olivier, Dec 28, 2004.

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  1. Rob Olivier

    Rob Olivier Member

    Here are some pics of my Trinket Snakes (Coelognathus helena). They are easy to breed. A few times a year they produce small clutches of eggs.

    The adults:

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    And some of the juvies:

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  2. SKULLMAN

    SKULLMAN Elite Member

    great looking snake,seen one at the pet store and i want to take him home so bad.how are they to care for?
     
  3. Rob Olivier

    Rob Olivier Member

    They are verry easy to care for. I would say the same conditions as a Corn Snake needs. Only the humidity must be a bit higher, somewhere around 65 to 70% will do fine. And the prey must be not to big as it are rather small snakes.
     
  4. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I have only rarely seen those around here. Not even at the expos. Are they prone to bite? Flighty?
     
  5. Rob Olivier

    Rob Olivier Member

    They have never bitten me once. CB is very friendly, WC can be aggressive (and full of parasites).
     
  6. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Cool snakes. They look an aweful lot like other rat snakes, what puts them in a different genus? The significantly smaller size?
     
  7. Jem_Scout

    Jem_Scout Elite Member

    Now those are some cool looking snakes! Can you house more than 1 in a tank? It would be so cool to see 3 of them (same sex of course) climbing around a bunch of driftwood!
    Do you breed them? I'll buy some come Spring! :D

    I'm going to look these guys up! heehee
     
  8. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    The genus Elaphe has been used to refer to both old and new world ratsnakes, an extremely varied group of snakes many very different from the others. Elaphe been going through a major overhaul recently due to the use of DNA sequencing. There have been all sorts of rearranging and realigning of species.
    For instance even the common cornsnake (formerly Elaphe guttata) is now being refered to as Pantherophis Guttata instead.
    Of course, like engineers, taxonomists love to change things so who knows where it will go!
     
  9. steel rip

    steel rip Elite Member

    you got some gorgeous Snakes there, :D
     
  10. Rob Olivier

    Rob Olivier Member

    Actually I keep three (1 male and 2 females) together in a tank. And yes I do breed them.
     
  11. Rob Olivier

    Rob Olivier Member

    Small correction: it must be Pantherophis guttatus.

    And thanks for the explanation about the taxonomy. My English is not good enough to do it myself :D
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    :eek: Ooops! I stand corrected! :eek:
    Thanks!
     
  13. Jem_Scout

    Jem_Scout Elite Member

    Remember me for a pair or a trio come Spring! :D
     
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