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Boa Will Not Eat Frozen

Discussion in 'Rosy Boas & Sand Boas' started by diehardislanders, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    My rosy boa is about 10 months old and has been raised by the breeder on live pinkies. When I try to feed her frozen, she slowly takes the head of the pinky in her mouth, then releases it and moves away. How can I get her trained on frozen thawed? It is not a HUGE deal, because she will not get big and I will be able to move from hoppers to rat pups, skipping adult mice, so she will not have to eat "dangerous" live feeders. However it would be easier, and I would prefer to feed her frozen thawed.
     
  2. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    Really patience. If she don't eat just skip that feed. Don't give up. Don't try to feed frozen one day then live if he don't take it. It took my ball pythons about 2-3 months before they'd take them. I used to feed live until one of my snakes got bit. I freaked of course.

    Also, how are you thawing. I leave them in a ziplock baggie at room temp for a while. Right before I feed I dry them with a blow dryer to get them warmer. At first I had to shake it to create live movements. Now that all mine are used to frozen they just take it as soon as I put it in there.

    You could ease into it by offering fresh killed for a while then switching to frozen thawed. That's what we had to do with my hog island Boa. Good luck and let us know.
     
  3. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    I put them in a ziplock bag, and then in hot water, take them out, and wait till they are at room temperature. My corns have no problem with this method. Thankfully, I have a young savannah monitor garbage disposal. lol Thx, I will try fresh-killed tonight.
     
  4. justor

    justor Elite Member

    Sounds like she is interested at first, and then loses interest once she starts eating. That might be because the head is too cold (not properly thawed). The head and hips of a mouse take the longest to thaw, so perhaps your frozen feeders are just a little too frozen still? How long do you thaw them, and do you heat them up once they are thawed?
    My snake eats large mice which I let thaw for about 2.5-3 hours making sure the head and hips are not cold at all, and then I submerge the mouse in a ziplock bag in hot water (not boiling, just hot) for a few minutes so it's nice and warm to the touch.
     
  5. justor

    justor Elite Member

    So are you saying you put them in hot water while still frozen? Or do you thaw them out first?
     
  6. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    Does this make a difference justor? I used to do this at first but that's when they weren't taking it. I switched and they started taking them??????
     
  7. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    I put them in hot water while frozen, then once they feel soft i take them out for about 45 mins in room temp
     
  8. justor

    justor Elite Member

    I would let them thaw completely before warming them up. Putting a frozen mouse in hot water will defrost the outside very quickly, but may leave the insides cold still, and in some cases still frozen solid even though they feel soft and warm to the touch. You might be able to effectively thaw a pinky by simply putting it in hot water as you have done because they are so small, but for larger mice I don't think it would work. Just to be sure you aren't offering a rodent that is still partially frozen I would let it thaw at room temp until it's no longer cold at all, and then submerge it in hot water for a minute or two. You do not want to use heat to thaw something, only to warm it up once it has been thuroughly thawed.

    It only takes a couple hours to thaw a mouse. Theres just no need for shortcuts in my opinion.
     
  9. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    Good to know. Thanks.
     
  10. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    I am going to try again tonight with a freshkilled. I will keep you guys posted
     
  11. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    She would not take it, so I fed her live. She is so active it makes me second guess my husbandry. Even after she ate a huge meal she only sat for 30 minutes and is now mobile and exploring her enclosure
     
  12. BlackJack

    BlackJack Subscribed User Premium Member

    You can put the ziplock bag with the frozen feeder in lukewarm water. When it is soft, DON'T COOL IT TO ROOM TEMP!!! Put it in HOT HOT (not boiling) water just before feeding.
    It could be that the boa is smelling the food, but it's too cold to be "real". A mouse or rat has a body temp of about 100F, so you have to get the feeder HOT before feeding... either in hot water, under a spot lamp or with a blow-dryer!!
    Good luck -- it takes time, but it's worth it.
     
  13. DarkMagician207

    DarkMagician207 Elite Member

    It also may depend on what time you feed her. Rosys are dusk feeders. If you feed her in a separate bin, try during the evening or night when it's dark. You can also try covering her container with a dark towel or blanket and leave her in there for a bit. Just make sure it has a lid so she can't get out. Also as they get older they don't eat as often. I got my rosy when he was already an adult. He's about 10 years old give or take a couple years. He eats every 3 weeks or so and goes off feed for the winter for about 5-6 months depending on when he starts.
     
  14. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    wow that is a long time to be off-feed. Anything else you can tell me about rosys? It is hard to find good info on them. My girl is very active, alot more than I thought she'd be. Awesome pet.
     
  15. DarkMagician207

    DarkMagician207 Elite Member

    It freaked me out the first year I had him and he did that but I got him from a friend's husband and he said that he had done that too when they had him so now that I expect it, it doesn't bother me anymore. I was used to my corn snake being a garbage disposal and every time I fed him. Out of my 3 snakes, my rosy is the calmest. Sometimes I see him cruising around and sometimes I don't. He loves spending time under his substrate, it's deep enough for him to burrow in and sometimes when he makes his tunnels up against the glass you can see them. I have learned that what may seem like a long time to us is nothing to the snake lol.

    I know when I feed him, he doesn't like activity around him so that's how I found out covering his feeding bin with something dark helps. Sometimes it's not enough and I have to pull down my shades (they're in my room and turn my lights off. I think it makes him more comfortable and since they eat during evening hours, maybe that's what he likes. He started out on live pinkies and fuzzies and when I got him he was on mice. I always prekilled them and then eventually switched over to feeding frozen thawed. He accepted them pretty easily and maybe he was on frozen thawed before I got him, I don't know I didn't think to ask because back then, I didn't really know much about that method. It can be done though so don't give up. I've read on here an idea of some people using a prekilled smaller prey item then once it's almost done going down they nudge the frozen thawed mouse into the snake's mouth to follow and that's how they get theirs used to it. Mine always definitely has to have his warm enough if he's interested in eating. If it's cool in any spot, he won't touch it.
     
  16. Seth702

    Seth702 Member

    Im still new to Snake owner ship, but because of that ive been reading everything in site and watched many many videos in the recent weeks. What i have learned about feeding f/t is you almost have the "trick" the snake into thinking it has live pray till they are used to takeing f/t. Heating up the rodent to above room temp is to allow the snake to use its senses to find and kill its prey as though it would naturally, appealing to its instincts. I set the head of the rodent next to my heat lamp for 10-15 seconds just before offereing it. One thing to remember when heating is not to use anything that can "cook" the meal. Microwaves and some other methods cook from the inside out. So you may have an inside temp hot enough to burn the snake even though the outside is only warm, so avoid those methods. I havent tried the Hair dryer or hot water myself but i see it mentioned often and assume it works well. GL in your efforts.
     
  17. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    Thanks for the help guys. Her next feeding is next week, i will keep you guys posted. I was suprised at how cool rosy boas are. I think i am going to get another. They are awesome pets.
     
  18. DarkMagician207

    DarkMagician207 Elite Member

    They really are. Good luck. :)
     

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