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Any Credible Breeders?

Discussion in 'Emerald Tree Boa/Arboreal Boas' started by Steven080808, Jun 22, 2009.

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  1. Steven080808

    Steven080808 Member

    I've just started finally getting all of my supplies for a ETB. Now that I'm almost done after so long. I'm finding it really hard to find credible breeders in the states that have CB ETB's. If anyone knows of some it would be greatly appreciated.

    Also any additional knowledge to the success of owning a ETB would be appreciated aswell. Like handling/taming tips mainly, anything else would be great!
     
  2. Steven080808

    Steven080808 Member

  3. shwknight

    shwknight Elite Member

    Welcome to the site :)

    Blackjack is who you'd want to talk to about ETB's she has an AWESOME set up for hers. Sorry but that's all the help I can offer since I don't have any snakes :(
     
  4. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    I think most people regard ETB's as a look but don't touch kind of species - though the ones I have spoken to say It's much safer to handle them during the day. Apparently, they get quite snippy when handled at night. Have you checked out their dentition? Impressive.

    That link describes a good approach to take with the handling of any species - slow and gentle. Keep us posted!
     
  5. Dogboa

    Dogboa Elite Member

    There are probably very few breeders that have available animals right now. Most babies are born later in the year. The earliest litter I've ever had was in August, most came late November through December.

    Rico is one of the best breeders out there. BTW, are you looking for a northern or basin?

    Craig
     
  6. BlackJack

    BlackJack Subscribed User Premium Member

    Thanks for the compliment, Steve, but we own Green Tree Pythons, not Emerald Tree Boas. I think our terrariums/set ups would work just as well for ETBs though, but I don't have any tips on ETB care.

    Our Green Tree Python Enclosure Plans
     
  7. Dogboa

    Dogboa Elite Member

    From those who I know that keep both, the care is essentially the same and enclosures that work for one will work for the other. Because emeralds don't lay eggs, there is no need for a hide box, which I understand is necessary for gravid morelia. DTH's and NTL's may vary between the two. Emerald neonates are much larger than morelia hatchlings and probably easier to get feeding, but that is just a guess, besides the fact that reputable breeders do not sell animals that aren't well established, a purchaser wouldn't have to worry about it.

    Craig
     
  8. shwknight

    shwknight Elite Member

    :eek: for some reason I thought you had ETB's Sorry :(
     
  9. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    Good luck, when you find a breeder you feel you can work with, feel free to share photos.
     
  10. Steven080808

    Steven080808 Member

    My uncle ( I think out of spite of me...) just bought one from the reptile expo around me. He's had it for little over a month and looks amazing. He's had a gtp but was way to aggressive to be had around young children. But the female etb is by far one of the most tame snakes I've come across. But he made the mistake of changing the water bowl late one night and caught a wicked bite. So I guess you can say they are a dr. jackel and mr. hyde personality. But I am looking for a Northern, basin's are nice but I like the pattern and coloration of the majority of northern's.
     
  11. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    Wow, I would LOVE to see a photo of that. We are very blood thirsty folks on here, and love to see bloody bites. :D
     
  12. Steven080808

    Steven080808 Member

    Heh well the next time I see him if he hasn't taken a picture of it yet I'll get on of his scar. He said two fangs got lost when he was bit. I heard there teeth are like sharks. In which another is waiting to come out when one is lost. I don't know if that is fact or just rumor though.
     
  13. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    From what I have experienced personally, snakes will typically loose a tooth or two from time to time in the process of eating or biting owners. They are able to replace them and usually there is no problem if the snake is in good health. If the snake is a victim of poor husbandry on the part of the owner(improper humidity,improper temps,substrate too wet, etc) the problem can grow into an infection which can then lead to mouth-rot.
     
  14. Dogboa

    Dogboa Elite Member

    Emeralds front teeth (both top and bottom) have several replacements ready to go at any given time. They will often shed teeth during normal shed periods.

    Unlike pit-vipers that extend the fangs out during a strike, emeralds front teeth act like meat hooks too snag prey. When they strike, the teeth stay curved back, sliding over the prey. When the prey reacts to pull away, they encounter the business end of those teeth and find themselves caught fast. Immediately the snake rolls the prey, wrapping it into their coils while using their tail section to anchor them to the branch. The whole point is to secure the prey and not lose it. Much energy is spent catching prey and if it is dropped, it's gone.

    Humans have a natural reaction to pull back when bitten. This just drives those long front teeth deeper causing more damage. Getting bitten isn't pleasant and you bleed alot! ;)

    Craig
     
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