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  1. #11
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    416
    Whoever uses wheat bran, did you just get the idea in your head and try it? Or did some one tell you about it?
    The more you whine, the worse it will get.






  2. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    14
    It says NOT to Feed it to your Dragon because it is nutritionally incomplete. It doesn't say it will harm your dragon if s/he ingest some of it.

    I wouldn't feed a dragom iceberg lettuce, but if s/he eats it it won't make it sick.

    Oh, BTW, it is RED on the list!!

  3. #13
    Elite Member beardiedragon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    61
    yes iceberg lettuce can make a BD sick. It can cause diarrea and that leads to dehydration.
    Bennett Greenberg

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    of the Florida Orange

  4. #14
    Registered User Enigma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    11

    Exclamation Eeek!

    so as long as you dragons are not ingesting the substrate i guess it would be okay.
    BD's will always ingest their substrate if it is of the "particle" kind. There is no way around it. They lick their surroundings hundred times a day everyday... with each lick they take in a bit of the substrate. It is physically impossible for them not to. Any ingested particles build up inside their intestines into a "cement" like substance... this happens more with sand particles, but particles are particles are particles. Period. This build up will, over time, cause serious impaction. There is no way around that.

    You all make good points, just because WE... HUMANS... can eat it and safely digest it.. doesn't mean Bearded Dragons... REPTILES, can. We can eat spinach and be VERY healthy... Spinach is toxic to Bearded Dragons, it robs their body of calcium thus leading to MBD (Metabolic Bone Disease). The most fearded disease for Bearded Dragons (aside from yellow fungus).

    Not only that, but high humidity/moisture levels DO and WILL grow molds and fungus'. Some believe that this is where "Yellow Fungus" came from. Either way... No mold growth or high humidity is EVER good for a Bearded Dragon. They need 35-40% humidity, no higher, no lower. Using a substrate that soaks it up and holds it like a sponge is just asking for a sick Bearded Dragon!!!

    This is what I have always said to those who consider any type of particle substrate...:

    If using it HAS a risk, but NOT using it has NO risk... why use it?

    For the best substrates... try Duck Brand Non-Adhesive Shelf Liner, Paper Towels, or News Paper with safe Ink.

  5. #15
    Elite Member Scaley Fetish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    56
    Being a huge fan of proper husbandry, which means copious research before taking on a new pet, I did find that that there is little wrong with using the wheat bran. What I didnt like was that it is extremely high in phosphorous. And of course the fungal possibility.

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