Reptile Forums - Herp Center
Advertise Here ^       


    Reptile Forums - Herp Center » Leopard Gecko Care Guide


This menu can be collapsed on each page by clicking the + above.

  Leopard Gecko Caresheet  Previous Leopard Gecko Caresheet
    About This Guide
    Introduction to Leopard Geckos
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Taxonomy
         Physical Characteristics
             Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Lamellae
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Behaviors
    Selection
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Physical Appearance
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Check List
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Breeders vs. Petstores
    Preparation
    Housing
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Setups
             Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Aquariums
             Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Racks - WIP
                   Leopard Gecko Rack Plans
                       1. Rack Plans (p1)
                       2. Rack Plans (p2)
                       3. Rack Plans (p3)
                  Leopard Geckos Breeding Rack Plans  Breeding Rack Plans
                  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Simple Rack System Plans
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Heat Tape
                   Wiring Heat Tape To Racks
                  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Wiring Tape To Dimmer Switches
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Custom Enclosures
    Substrates
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Artificial
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Natural
                Calcium Sand Substrates - Dangers
  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Hides - Shelters
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Moist Hide Creation
    Heating
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Heat Rocks - Hidden Danger
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Temperature Control
    Lighting
  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Tank Decor
  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Landscaping - WIP
         Artificial Terrain
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Planting
  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Diet
         Supplementation
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Feeder Prey
             Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Feeding - Offering Prey - Quantities
                   Complete Feeder Insect Index
                        Breeding Crickets
                       Breeding Mealworms  Breeding Mealworms
                       Breeding Waxworms  Breeding Waxworms
                       Breeding Butterworms  Breeding Butterworms
                       Breeding Superworms  Breeding Superworms
                       Breeding Silkworms  Breeding Silkworms
                       Breeding Phoenix Worms  Breeding Phoenix Worms
                       Breeding Orange Spotted Roaches  Breeding Orange Spotted Roach
                       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Breeding Lobster Roaches
  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Handling
    Cleaning
  Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Breeding
       Leopard Gecko Breeding Preparations  Preparations
         Sexing
         Cooling
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Grouping
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Egg Collecting
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Egg Candling
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Incubation
       Temperature Effects On Leopard Gecko Incubation  Temperature Effects On Incubation
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Rearing Offspring
       Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Large Scale - Commercial
    Genetics
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Introduction
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Terminology
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Basics 101
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Punnett Square
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Morphs List - WIP
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Ontogeny Chronology - WIP
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Creating New Morphs
    Health
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Quarantining
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Common Diseases
                Parasites
               Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Identification - Treatments
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Impaction
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  MBD (Hypocalcemia)
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Caudal Autotomy (Dropped Tail)
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Shedding Issues
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Vision Issues
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Cagemate Aggression
    Miscellaneous
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Coloring Pages
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Glossary
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Record Keeping
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Donations
          Leopard Geckos In Captivity  Advertising

Leopard Gecko Sexing

Leopard Gecko Sexing is not a very difficult task if you know what you are looking for. The largest mistake new enthusiasts make is that they attempt to sex a leopard gecko before the gecko is old enough. As a result, the female they believed they had ends up being a male.

Leopard geckos are sexually mature around 10 months of age and can be bred the following season if they are of the proper weight. (Please read our breeding section for more information on this.) Once the gecko has reached 5-6" in length, you can then reliably sex them. Unless you are experienced, sexing before the total length of the gecko reaches 5-6" is a gamble and may result in an inaccurate sexing.

When housing multiple leopard geckos together, it is crucial that you know the sex of the leopard geckos before they are placed together. Males will fight with one another over territory and this can result with both males being injured or killed.

Male Characteristics - Leopard Gecko Sexing

The physical characteristics of the male leopard gecko slightly differ from those of the female. When compared, male leopard geckos tend to be the heavier bodied sex. They also tend to have a broader head than the female. This method of sexing them however is completely unreliable.
 Leopard Gecko Sexing


To properly sex a male leopard gecko, there will be two unmistakable characteristics that stand out. The first will be the preanal pores found above the vent.

The preanal pores found on the male are used to excrete a wax-like substance that allows them to mark their territory. On occasion you may even witness the wax being excreted. The preanal pores will have small tubes everted through each opening. If you look closely, you will see that a wax-like substance is present. The image to the right show both the preanal pores of a male as well as the wax-like tubes that I am referring to.

Female Characteristics - Leopard Gecko Sexing

Females are define by their lack of male characteristics. Typically females are not as heavily bodied as males, though there are some females that are extremely large. They also typically have heads that are not as broad as the heads found on males. Again, there are occasions where the females physical appearance based on size would certainly indicate that it were a male. This is the very reason that the comparison of body mass and size is not a reliable method for sexing leopard geckos.
 Sexing


The actual sexing comes in the fact that female leopard geckos lack hemipenal bulges below the vent and their lack of preanal pores. Some females WILL have slightly noticeable preanal pores, but they are not nearly as prominent as they are in males. When sexing, look for both the hemipenal bulges as well as the preanal pores. If there are no hemipenal bulges, you have a female unless the leopard gecko simply was too young to sex accurately.

Leopard Gecko Temperature Sexing

If you are breeding leopard geckos, you have a wonderful tool at your disposal. Leopard geckos are capable of being incubated for sex. The first two - three weeks of a geckos incubation is when the animals sex will be defined. Based on the temperature in which you incubate, you can predetermine the sex of the leopard gecko with a 99% accuracy rating. This is often why you will see "temperature sexed male or female" when looking at various online breeder sites. This simply means the hatchling being sold was incubated for either male or female.

Temperature sexing is an invaluable tool for those working with leopard geckos to create new morphs and phases. Since males can not be housed together do to aggression, many breeders limit the number of males that they produce. This allows them to breed out harems of females that will hopefully have the genetic trait in which the breeder is attempting to work with or create. To learn more about how the genetics work, read our genetics section.

Sexing Temperatures

Females are easily produced when the incubator is set at a constant 79-81° for the first 3 weeks of incubation. At these temperatures you will yield 99.9% females. Following those 3 weeks, the incubation temperature should be raised to 88-90°.

Males are best produced at temperatures of 88-91°.

A mix of both males and females is best produced when the incubator is running at 85-87°.

The temperature in which you incubate at also plays a few other roles in the development of the embryo. Please read the breeding section for more information to learn how temperature affects the offspring.


Share This Care Guide:   Facebook Digg it Google Technorati Twitter MySpace Reddit Yahoo! My Web Windows Live Gmail Stumbleupon del.icio.us
Powered by Herp Center Copyright Herp Center - Richard Brooks
© 2004 - 2014 All rights reserved.
Online Since 2004