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What Can Be Housed Together?

  1. #1
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    What Can Be Housed Together?

    I found a baby mediterranean house gecko in my sink, went out and bought a 18x18x18 terrarium for it until it got stronger and let it go in the back yard. I dumped the 10-12 remaining crickets in the terrarium and after eating the eggs, drownings, squashing every escapee that climbs through an air vent, there are now about 60-70 pinhead sized crickets growing up. I even put the tank on the back porch with the doors/top open for 3 days and none of them wanted to run free.

    I'm looking to get a much larger vivarium, probably this 36x18x36 Exo-Terra Glass Terrarium - Desert Reptile Terrarium and Glass Terrarium from petco.com with about a 10x10 water spot and a filtration system, some live plants, corkboard back with a few 'ledges' on it, a couple of hides and a sunning spot - but I'd like to get herps that eat insects and i'll just keep the smaller cage for feeder crickets as the main food (with some variety of course). Tossing the crickets into the back yard and switching to dubias wouldn't be a problem either.

    What can be housed together? A garter snake and two green anoles? 2 leopard geckos and an american toad? A Corn snake and a pair of tree frogs? None of the above? Probably not possible but i'd like to get a small water snake and/or toad, a pair of geckos, maybe 2-3 water snails to feed off whatever ends up on the bottom. Variety.

    I don't want to overcrowd the tank, and I don't want them to get stressed. And looking for herps that live around the same temperatures with diets that are close - that won't eat each other.


    Suggestions?






  2. #2
    Elite Member justor's Avatar
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    suggestion... abandon this idea. It's never a good idea to put different species together in a small space. Especially snakes with frogs or lizards, those are natural prey items for many snakes. Basically you're not going to be able to avoid stressing something out. Even putting multiple leopard geckos together can be a bad idea.
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    Elite Member Dragoness's Avatar
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    if you want multiple herps, you really should have multiple cages. That said, various institutions successfully cohabit species, but a TON of research goes into it first. Your best bet is to stick with one, for a cage of that size.

    If you want herps with the same living requirements, with the best *possibility* of successful cohabitation, you will need to find:

    Two from the same natural ecosystem (for example, 2 from the floors of amazonian rainforests, or 2 from sub-Saharan African savannahs. They need to come from the same geographical region, and the same habitats and ecosystems within that region. They have to be species that would naturally coexist.

    They also have to be two species that would normally not interact much, or have any kind of predator-prey relationship.

    They also must not be the kind that compete for the same types of food.

    The enclosure will need to be large enough to provide each animal with plenty of space to evade the other animals, should it choose to do so. In nature, animals have almost infinite space to move away from one another. Lets say hypothetically, you find 2 species, whose general care states that they need an enclosure of approximately 40 gallons. You now need a minimum of approximately 80 gallons of space to provide even remotely adequate space for both species.

    You will need to provide separate basking spots and hide spots for each individual.

    I think the best species cohabitation I ever saw was at a zoo I worked at. The herp department had a mixed species exhibit which housed blue poison dart frogs with eyelash pit vipers. The enclosure was about 4'x4' square, and 3' tall. It housed a breeding colony of half a dozen frogs, and 3 vipers, each about 18-22" long.

    Both came from amazonian rain forests.

    The snakes do not normally eat the frogs in the wild because of their poison (and tend to favor avian prey anyways). The frogs certainly don't try to eat the snakes.

    They do not compete for food - the snakes are fed vertebrate prey, the frogs pinhead crickets or flightless fruit flies.

    They did not compete for space, since the snakes preferred the vines and branches up high, and the frogs preferred their pools and mossy rocks and leaf debris down below, though the snakes did venture down to drink on occasion, and the frogs are perfectly capable of climbing even glass.

    Just some food for thought.
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    Wasn't sure if there were some types that got along well together, say one that likes to climb and stay in the foliage and one that prefers the ground, etc.

    Thanks for the answers. =)

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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    not in an enclosure that size. To do it correctly, you would need something more like you find at the zoo, an iguana sized cage almost. Think 4 x 4 x 6 feet. You would need animals that come from the same location in the wild so you could set it up all the same.

    Mixing species is not for the faint of heart, and not the novice keeper. Zoos usually don't even do it. There is a huge list of reasons not to. Stress is one. Cross contamination of illness is another. it's just not a good idea. If the pros don't do it, then you shouldn't either.
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    From your question I am guessing that you also have another thing against you.
    Lack of experience.
    The people who successfully keep multispecies enclosures already have an intimate working knowledge of the species involved. It wasn't just a case of getting some animals, tossing them in together and seeing what happens.
    Its hard enough to learn about a single animal's husbandry requirements without trying to figure out who regurged their food or who isn't pooping.
    Stick to a single animal enclosure.
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    Elite Member Wyldrose's Avatar
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    This seems to be a popular topic on many forums. If you can convert an entire room into an enclosure then you could possibly house multi species as long as they come from the exact same place and are not prey. With this idea it is also recomended to feed each animal alone in a tub so you know who is eating.
    I have seen many mistakes from co-habitats, like a mouse was returned to the petshop minus a tail because the hamster didn't like her. I have seen obese rabbits that live with walking skeleton guinea pigs. Someone put tree frogs with their hermit crabs, they died because all of the cage deco was soaked in salt water to prevent mold. Heck I know people who have had their cats killed by their dogs who where supposed to be good with them. I trust my dogs with my rabbits, when I supervise. I would love to have the rabbits free range (they are litter trainied) but am worried about how the dogs would be if I was not there. 90lbs vs 2lb rabbit not going to chance it lol.
    So the easy and recomened thing to do is keep one species per enclosure.
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    Quote Originally Posted by Merlin View Post
    From your question I am guessing that you also have another thing against you.
    Lack of experience.
    The people who successfully keep multispecies enclosures already have an intimate working knowledge of the species involved. It wasn't just a case of getting some animals, tossing them in together and seeing what happens.
    Its hard enough to learn about a single animal's husbandry requirements without trying to figure out who regurged their food or who isn't pooping.
    Stick to a single animal enclosure.
    Little rough, don't you think?

    I find a dozen different care sheets that are semi-contradictory just for 100 types frogs and toads kept as pets, not to count the other lizard or snake types. I doubt if any one or six people together know everything about every type of frog, toad, lizard, snake, etc and I am well aware that I am nowhere near an expert on any type. There could easily have been some types of herps that live symbiotically just as there are other non-herps species that do, and I was simply looking for information on if there were any that could be housed together. Which I now have, thanks to the other replies on the thread.

  9. #9
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    Little rough, don't you think?
    It wasn't intended to be. But you are asking about keeping species together that in nature would prey on each other. Or species that have wildly different living conditions. That to me indicates that you are seriously lacking in the knowledge to pull off what you are thinking. I wasn't attacking you, just pointing out that if you don't know even the basics of keeping a single species, trying for a multi species enclosure, particularly in a small enclosure, is setting you up for disaster.
    Merlin,
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    Re: What Can Be Housed Together?

    Quote Originally Posted by Merlin View Post
    I wasn't attacking you, just pointing out that if you don't know even the basics of keeping a single species.
    Again, thanks for saying that I'm a rank noob that has done no research and doesn't even know an alligator from a newt, because I asked a reasonable question?

    Just have your final post saying how i'm an idiot and lock the thread please, this is going downhill.

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