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  1. #1
    Elite Member missabrat's Avatar
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    Hypoaspis Miles

    Has anyone ever tried this?
    Fungus Gnat, Thrips, Snake Mite Predator (Hypoaspis sp.)

    We have been over run with mites, for the second time this year, new rescues, no matter how well we quarantine them, always seem to bring them
    We have ordered the Hypoaspis Miles and one volunteer who has mites at home from a rescue, is already seeing results.
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  2. #2
    Administrator Merlin's Avatar
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    • My Reptiles

    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    I have never heard of those as a control on snake mites. I do know that the greenhouse industry has been using predator mites for years to control spider mites on plants.

    However as rapidly as reptile mites multiply I am not sure that I would be comfortable standing aroudn and waiting to see if they actually worked or not.
    Merlin,
    What's Life Without A Little Magic!

  3. #3
    Elite Member missabrat's Avatar
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    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    these are supposed to take control within 48 hours, I however will not be visiting the rescue until the mites are under control, reptile mites like to feast on me, no kidding... after being at the rescue I walk out with little red bumps all over my body, when I felt something biting me, I found a mite....at home we had a run of Tropical fur mites last year that did the same thing, not sure why they like me so much grrrrrr LOL
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  4. #4
    mld
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    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    That sound great, let us know it how it goes. I guess every insect would have a predator, I've heard of parasitic wasps used for some garden pests, they actually lay their eggs in a host and they hatch and eat the unwanted insect alive. There are also the lacewing larvae for aphids control. Mother nature is so cool, she rocks. It it works that's a bonus, no more chemicals to spray.
    Michele


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  5. #5
    Elite Member missabrat's Avatar
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    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    I will keep an update, I cannot stand bugs around the house LOL except for the few dozen crickets and roaches LOL. These mites were recommended by our herp vet.
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  6. #6
    Og_
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    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    Don't the mites that affect snakes live and breed in between the scales of reptiles? I would think that the predator mites would also have to get in there to eat them. If they stay in the soil, I'm not sure how effective they would be.
    Greg

  7. #7
    Elite Member missabrat's Avatar
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    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    from my understanding any warm moist place will be a breeding ground
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  8. #8
    Elite Member missabrat's Avatar
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    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    Found this on Melissa Kaplan's site : Getting rid of reptile mites


    Another reason it is so hard to kill them is that they spend a lot of their non-feeding and reproduction time in tiny moist crevices, both on the reptile and in its enclosure. At any one time, you will have mites in several different life stages in your reptile's enclosure and on its body. The stages, and the time it takes to morph to the next stage at certain temperatures, are:



    Life Stages / Morphs

    Environmental Temperature

    86 F / 30 C

    68 F / 20 C

    Egg

    28 hours

    98 hours

    Larva (non-feeding)

    18 hours

    47 hours

    Protonymph (feeding)

    3 days

    14 days

    Deuteronymph (non-feeding)

    13 hours

    26 hours

    Adult (feeding, mating)

    10 days

    32 days















    The protonymph will morph into a deuteronymph in the time indicated only if it finds a blood meal soon after it molts. If it does not, it can survive without a meal for 15-19 days before dying of starvation.

    Since reptile enclosure temperatures fluctuate from their daytime gradients to their nighttime gradients, the time between morphing may be prolonged.

    Snake mites are rather simple creatures. They basically travel in a line. If they hit an obstacle, like a wall, branch, water bowl, or body, they climb it rather than finding a way around it. If they are cold, they sense heat and make their way towards it. When they get too hot, they go off toward a cooler area. Moist, dark areas are preferred. If they find a hole leading out of the enclosure, they just keep walking, either walking off the edge of the table and falling to the floor, or walking up or down anything that comes into contact with the enclosure or the surface it is resting on: curtains, electrical cords, etc. With any luck (for you and your reptiles), it will starve to death before finding another host. If your cages are close together and there is lots of handling and opening and closing of doors and nice ventilation panels, the mites all too often find their way to another host, enabling them to do what they are genetically programmed to do: make more mites.

    A gravid female mite leaves her host, making her way to some dark, warm, moist crevice, pit, or other imperfection somewhere in or out of the reptile's enclosure. There she lays her eggs. The soft-bodied hatchlings remain where they hatch until they are old enough to molt to the protonymph stage. So long as the crevice or wherever they are remains moist, they will not die of dehydration.

    After molting to protonymph, the mite remains in its natal crevice until its exoskeleton firms up. Once it is hard and dry, the mite will no longer be in danger of dying of dehydration when it moves into drier areas. It begins to wander. If it encounters a host before it starves to death, it will lodge itself under or between scales where the skin is most accessible, and begin to feed. The mite can smell a host and will make its way towards one. The mite basically keep walking, heading towards the host-smell, warmth, and dark, stopping only when a special area on its back comes into contact with something - like the host's body.

    When the protonymph has had its fill, it drops off and wanders, in its straight-line way, towards someplace dark, moist crevice. There is molts to the deuteronymph stage. The non-feeding deuteronymphs can be active but they usually remain in the crevice until ready to complete its last molt into a feeding, breeding adult.

    During the latter part of the protonymph stage, or when in the deuteronymph stage, the mites pair off into sexual pairs. Soon after molting into adults, they will mate, after which they head off for a post-coital blood meal. Once they have had their fill, the gravid females head off to find a dark, moist crevice to lay their 60-80 eggs, while the males wander off to find more unmated females. After laying, females will continue to feed, her next 2-3 meals spread out about a week apart.
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  9. #9
    JMM
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    re: Hypoaspis Miles

    A couple of friends of mine have been using H. miles and say good things about them.

    As long as there are "bad" mites to eat (Ophionyssus natricis), they will do the job; when they´re all gone, they usually go canibalistic and eventually die (starve).

    The problem is you can only use them once; for one raid of mites. Because, as mentioned after all the mites are gone, they eventually starve to death. So, each purchase of H. miles is for "one treatment".

    Another note to be taken is that they don´t prey only on mites. So, if you have a naturalistic enclosure with, for instance, springtails (Collembola) and other useful hexapods, they may/will also become dinner of the H. miles.
    Regards,
    Joao

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